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Moving Onward?

Secondary Movers on the Fringes of Refugee Mobility in Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya

Jolien Tegenbos and Karen Büscher

a stronger dialogue between both academic fields, 9 here combining the strengths of mobilities’ holistic perspective to migration with migration studies’ engagement with policy categories. Our analysis investigates secondary movers whose

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The 'Empty Tomb' as Metaphor

Finding Comfort in Nothingness

Donna Young

This article considers the ways in which Roman Catholic pilgrims on a tour in the Holy Land reacted to displays of emotion, exposing both the fragility and the strength of a religious community struggling with uncertainties concerning belief and practice. Participants focused on a reading of the biblical gospel that, in its original form, omitted the story of Christ's resurrection. The pilgrims were encouraged to identify themselves with the earliest Christians confronted by an empty tomb and to explore the lessons in Mark's gospel for a community of Christians in crisis. The 'empty tomb' is read here as a metaphor for the 'limits of meaning', found in all practices of interpretation, whether exegetical or anthropological. Attention is focused on how various actors responded to each other and to a place, the Holy Land, which challenges the interpretive skills of most, particularly those encouraged to remain open and respectful of the stories and religious traditions of others.

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Pentecostalism and 'National Culture'

A Dialogue between Brazilian Social Sciences and the Anthropology of Christianity

Cecília L. Mariz and Roberta B.C. Campos

This article aims to show how the hegemonic interpretation of Pentecos- talism in Brazil has difficulty recognizing changes caused by these churches to 'local' cultures. We argue that this tendency can be explained by a widespread adherence to structuralist theories of society combined with an unwillingness to accept the reimag- ining of a national culture historically built up by Brazilian social science. We suggest that the Universal Church of the Kingdom of God has been the Pentecostal church most studied by Brazilian researchers because it provides a powerful means to indicate the strength of 'Brazilian culture'. Through our analysis of more recent studies, we point out the salience of these debates to wider questions relating to the emergent anthropology of Christianity, concluding that since neither discontinuities nor continuities can be denied in the field, the focus on one or the other dimension should be seen as a methodological choice rather than an orientation specifically arising from empirical observation.

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Debate

In Response to Charlie

Faisal Devji, Jane Garnett, Ghassan Hage, and Sondra L. Hausner

There is a close relation between satire and secularism as the latter came to emerge in Europe. Secularism, as is well-known, gained strength historically as a reaction to an era of European interreligious violence and massacres. It was not only a desire for the separation of church and state, as the classical formula has it. It was also an attempt to keep religious affect out of politics. This was in the belief that religion, because it is faith rather than reasoned thinking, produces too much of a narcissistic affect—that the faithful are unable to ‘keep their distance’ from what they believe in. It was thought that this narcissism was behind the murderous intensity of religiously driven conflicts. Being able to laugh at yourself literally means being able to not take yourself overly seriously. This, in turn, is crucial for the deintensification of the affects generated by the defense of what one believes in and for the relativization of one’s personal beliefs. Such relativization, as Claude Lévi- Strauss argued, is crucial for thinking oneself comparatively and in relation to others (the opposite of narcissism).

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Editorial

Mobility Studies, a Transdisciplinary Field

Dagmar Schäfer

mobilities. While this trend indicates the health and strength of mobility studies per se, it brings with it the obligation to consider new ways to reach out and expand. Acknowledging this trend, the journal Transfers , in its eighth year, is reorganizing

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New Mobilities, Spaces, and Ideas to Market

European Travel Writers and the Making of a Genre—Comment

Steven D. Spalding

benefit to both fields of inquiry. I examine the ambitions of the section, discuss strengths and weaknesses of each article, and then conclude with thoughts on ways forward. The introduction explains that “itinerant knowledge” is about travel narratives

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Maria Hupfield

strength and care. Our work is complementary. We use everyday contemporary materials to create and navigate unexpected visuals that reflect the absurd reality and complexity of the times. Figure 6 KA-POW! 10 × 18 × 18 inches, cedar and yellow

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Becoming-Wolf

Or The Art of Affection in Nicolette Krebitz’s Wild

Tanja Prokić

, the wildest of all animals in direct proximity to human society, strikes back. Historically a symbol for autonomy, freedom, strength, and sovereignty, the wolf embodies the cultural history and projection surface upon which questions of governability

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Mimi Sheller and Gijs Mom

media representations, including an analysis of films. Thus, his work embodies the strengths of cross-disciplinary and historical perspectives that Transfers advocates. Following the research articles, we offer an engaging call to action in our Ideas

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Estella Carpi, Sandy F. Chang, Kristy A. Belton, Katja Swider, Naluwembe Binaisa, Magdalena Kubal-Czerwińska, and Jessie Blackbourn

recommendations. In my opinion the main strength of the book is its use of original empirical data to analyze what actually happens to individuals who wish to have their statelessness status determined and want to claim protection on that basis. This study is