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First as Tragedy, Then as Teleology

The Politics/People Dichotomy in the Ethnography of Post-Yugoslav Nationalization

Stef Jansen

people” that reinforces this. To complement existing strengths of ethnographic work on BiH, it seeks to contribute to the development of tools to also register and analyze nonelite enactments of nationalism, recovering the notion of politics as a

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Pentecostalism and 'National Culture'

A Dialogue between Brazilian Social Sciences and the Anthropology of Christianity

Cecília L. Mariz and Roberta B.C. Campos

This article aims to show how the hegemonic interpretation of Pentecos- talism in Brazil has difficulty recognizing changes caused by these churches to 'local' cultures. We argue that this tendency can be explained by a widespread adherence to structuralist theories of society combined with an unwillingness to accept the reimag- ining of a national culture historically built up by Brazilian social science. We suggest that the Universal Church of the Kingdom of God has been the Pentecostal church most studied by Brazilian researchers because it provides a powerful means to indicate the strength of 'Brazilian culture'. Through our analysis of more recent studies, we point out the salience of these debates to wider questions relating to the emergent anthropology of Christianity, concluding that since neither discontinuities nor continuities can be denied in the field, the focus on one or the other dimension should be seen as a methodological choice rather than an orientation specifically arising from empirical observation.

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Debate

In Response to Charlie

Faisal Devji, Jane Garnett, Ghassan Hage, and Sondra L. Hausner

There is a close relation between satire and secularism as the latter came to emerge in Europe. Secularism, as is well-known, gained strength historically as a reaction to an era of European interreligious violence and massacres. It was not only a desire for the separation of church and state, as the classical formula has it. It was also an attempt to keep religious affect out of politics. This was in the belief that religion, because it is faith rather than reasoned thinking, produces too much of a narcissistic affect—that the faithful are unable to ‘keep their distance’ from what they believe in. It was thought that this narcissism was behind the murderous intensity of religiously driven conflicts. Being able to laugh at yourself literally means being able to not take yourself overly seriously. This, in turn, is crucial for the deintensification of the affects generated by the defense of what one believes in and for the relativization of one’s personal beliefs. Such relativization, as Claude Lévi- Strauss argued, is crucial for thinking oneself comparatively and in relation to others (the opposite of narcissism).

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Steven Brooke, Dafne Accoroni, Olga Ulturgasheva, Anastasios Panagiotopoulos, Eugenia Roussou, Francesco Vacchiano, Jeffrey D. Howison, Susan Greenwood, Yvonne Daniel, Joana Bahia, Gloria Goodwin Raheja, Charles Lincoln Vaughan, Katrien Pype, and Linda van de Kamp

techniques and X-rays. Nevertheless, Moroccan medical syncretism between the hospital and traditional healers shows the strength and vitality of Sufi ontology, enacted by female practitioners through the body of Muslim women. The postcard-like image of an

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Fighting Fire with Fire

Resistance to Transitional Justice in Bahrain

Ciara O’Loughlin

Barria 2009 ). This hypothesis suggests that the ability of the public or outgoing regime to impose sanctions on the government for not complying with its demands is linked to the relative strength of each actor ( Skaar 1999: 1112 ). For example, truth

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Frauke Mennes, John P. Hayes, David Kloos, Martha Lagace, Morten Koch Andersen, Somdeep Sen, Matthew Porges, and Sa’ed Atshan

ascetic. Kalli is an NGO-employed woman and a popular leader, who draws strength from “being completely mad” to confront her higher-caste neighbors, refuting revenge but not agon . Bansi is an erotic ascetic, who uses subtle agonistic to live both parts

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Meike J. de Goede

religious project is thus actually about ngolo (power or strength) or, rather, empowerment. A young man in the Pool district explained as much to Balandier: We are poor because the white man’s God does not help us become rich. He does not love us. Now, we

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Ayse Serap Avanoglu, Diana Riboli, Juan Javier Rivera Andía, Annalisa Butticci, Iain R. Edgar, Matan Shapiro, Brooke Schedneck, Mark Sedgwick, Suzane de Alencar Vieira, Nell Haynes, Sara Farhan, Fabián Bravo Vega, Marie Meudec, Nuno Domingos, Heidi Härkönen, Sergio González Varela, and Nathanael Homewood

in such a wide variety of settings and countries is both a strength and a weakness. It is a strength because it can, for example, show how widespread a practice such as istikhara is. It is a weakness because the settings are so varied that Edgar is

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Peter Hervik

flaws of the opponent who is the object of contempt. In Denmark, as well as the Nordic world more generally, the opponent is “Muslims.” The way in which Muslims are talked about in Denmark and France often draws argumentative strength and infusion of

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Stacy M. K. George

use to talk and to think with” ( Collins 2004: 107 ). It produces “confidence, elation, strength, enthusiasm, and initiative in taking action” (ibid.: 49). The greater the emotional experience, the greater the level of commitment and participation in