Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 132 items for :

  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Nature, Science and Witchcraft

Interview with Fay Weldon

Joanna Zylinska and Fay Weldon

JZ: I realise that quoting excerpts from other people's essays on your work may seem ironic, as it creates a danger of 'monumentalising' the author and letting others speak 'in your name'. Nevertheless, I would like to take the risk of beginning with the words of Lorna Sage. In her preface to The Life and Loves of a She-Develop Lorna Sage writes: 'Fay's lack of respect for "nature" . . . is one of her greatest strengths: she knows it's fetish and attacks it with its own weapons'. I wonder, could you comment a little on your relation to nature?

Restricted access

The Rape of the Lock

Desire between Couple(t)s – a Counselling Intervention

Dennis Brown

I want, here, to focus on this originary motive for the poem, and to suggest ways in which it informs the poet’s larger purpose – to create a social poem which negotiates tensions within the age-old battle of the sexes. The finished masterpiece, I shall argue, has relevance not only to contemporary debates about the ideology of gender3 but, in particular, to the rise of our now-ubiquitous ‘counselling’ culture. For such a discussion it is important that the ‘Offence’ occurred within a tightly knit, ‘marginal’ group, and that the poetic strategy develops a phantasmagoric ‘interpretation’ of the incident, as a proto-Freudian6 narrative in which attentive intelligence has transformed the strength of Desire into mock-heroic sweet reason.

Restricted access

Masculine Appearances

Male Physicality on the Late-Victorian Stage

David Haldane Lawrence

James Eli Adams, in Dandies and Desert Saints: Styles of Victorian Masculinity (1995), has written of the ‘intractable element of theatricality in all masculine self-fashioning, which inevitably makes appeal to an audience, real or imagined … even the normative is typically asserted as an unending performance’. It could also be argued that ‘masculine self-fashioning’, and the necessity for display to an audience gaze, is taken to its extreme in the world of entertainment, where men appear on stage, in costume, wearing make-up, and acting out aspects of masculinity often alien to their own personae. Through applying this debate to nineteenth-century popular culture, this article discusses men who confronted the gaze of both sexes while posing as living statues, displaying muscular strength, or encouraging idolatry through their charismatic presences on the legitimate stage.

Restricted access

Touring the Dead Lands

Emily Eden, Victorian Famines, and Colonial Picturesque

Pablo Mukherjee

There is a striking tonal similarity amongst those who reviewed Emily Eden’s account of her journey with her brother George Auckland – the recently appointed Govenor-General of British India – across the northern provinces of the country between 1837 and 1840. On its publication in 1866, the Athenaeum decided that like Lawrence Sterne’s Sentimental Journey, Eden’s book had no information of interest to the Statistical Society. The Fortnightly Review agreed: ‘it is true that very little of what is commonly called “useful knowledge” will be found in these volumes’. Yet, it is precisely Eden’s failure to provide ‘useful knowledge’ that was seen as the strength of her work. Freshness, humour, feminine vivacity, grace, and charm were the typical adjectives employed to describe Eden’s prose. Moreover, the reviewers seem to have decided that Up the Country was best evoked in visual terms. The Athenaeum praised Eden for capturing the ‘picturesque appearance of Indian life’ and representing her ‘picturesque misery and magnificence’; the Fortnightly Review applauded the book as ‘a series of pictures true to life. In her letters we do not read about India; we see it’.

Restricted access

Sartre, Lacan, and the Ethics of Psychoanalysis

A Defense of Lacanian Responsibility

Blake Scott

being closer than is often portrayed in the literature. One reason I think that such a comparison has proved so difficult in the past is the continuing strength of the polemics between humanism and structuralism, which, at least in the English literature

Restricted access

Steven Lovatt

. Each of the principal characters is associated with certain qualities that are in turn related to distinctive tempos in the narration. George Morn (‘George’, from the Greek, connoting earth and physical work) represents strength, manliness, self

Restricted access

Christine Regan

’s utterance is ‘coarser stuff than silk’ sourced from ‘deep down in their gut’ and that rough-diamond depth of feeling and effort to be understood are hereditary strengths in The School of Eloquence . Harrison’s aspiration to a universally accessible poetic

Restricted access

A Wolf’s Eye View of London

Dracula, Penny Dreadful, and the Logic of Repetition

Dragoş Manea

and strength. Yet whereas Quincey is a flat, secondary character, whose ‘raw dialect … evokes comedy rather than sympathy’, as Brook Miller has put it, 25 Ethan can arguably be read, alongside Vanessa, as one of the series’ most complex characters

Restricted access

Emanuel Stelzer

, hostility, but also pity; commiseration, as well as ridicule. The significance and strength of these plays lie exactly in the polyphony of voices which dramatize the different reactions of a community. We are provided with many points of view concerning an

Restricted access

Green Fields and Blue Roads

The Melancholy of the Girl Walker in Irish Women’s Fiction

Maureen O’Connor

increasingly alienated from her own body, all bodies, dreading to be reminded of blood, ‘Her father’s, her mother’s, her ancestors’, her own’ (216). She counters this and finds strength and succour by insisting on materiality, literally touching her ‘natural