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Boys and Education in the Global South

Emerging Vulnerabilities and New Opportunities for Promoting Changes in Gender Norms

Gary Barker, Ravi Verma, John Crownover, Marcio Segundo, Vanessa Fonseca, Juan Manuel Contreras, Brian Heilman, and Peter Pawlak

This article presents a review of global data on boys' education in the Global South and recent findings on the influence of boys' educational attainment on their attitudes and behaviors in terms of gender equality. The article also presents three examples—from Brazil, the Balkans, and India—on evaluated, school-based approaches for engaging boys and girls in reducing gender-based violence and promoting greater support for gender equality. Recommendations are provided for how to integrate such processes into the public education system in such a way that provides benefits for both boys and girls in a relational approach.

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Women and War in the Balkans

A Comparative Review Essay

Maria Bucur

, Women and Yugoslav Partisans: A History of World War II Resistance , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015, 287 pp., 11 illustrations, GBP 24.99 (paperback), ISBN: 978-1-31611-862-7. We have come a long way since the days when talking about the

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Rory Conces

Political realism remains a powerful theoretical framework for thinking about international relations, including the war on terrorism. For Morgenthau and other realists, foreign policy is a matter of national interest defined in terms of power. Some writers view this tenet as weakening, if not severing, realism's link with morality. I take up the contrary view that morality is embedded in realist thought, as well as the possibility of realism being thinly and thickly moralised depending on the moral psychology of the agents. I argue that a prima facie case can be made within a thinly moralised realism for a relatively weak ally like Bosnia to enter the war on terrorism. An inflationary model of morality, however, explains how the moral horror of genocide in an ally's past may lead to a thickened moralised realism such that allied policy-makers question their country's entry into the war.

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Federica Tarabusi

us. I know the Balkans, and I could say that any excuse is a good one for pointing out hostility toward one of his fellow citizens … The unity of people here continues to be almost a mirage.” This apparently trivial episode weaving together emic and

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Shakespeare in Sarajevo

Theatrical and Cinematic Encounters with the Balkans War

Sara Soncini

Albanian and the Macedonian theatre companies that were appointed to perform, respectively, the second and the third part of Henry VI but also, earlier in the process, by the Globe management when commissioning what instantly became branded as theBalkan

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Introduction

The Presence of the Past in the Era of the Nation-State

Nicolas Argenti

order of things” to a “national order of things” implied a connection with the past as much as a break from it. 2 The workshop that gave birth to this publication, part of the Balkan Futures series of the British Schools at Athens and Ankara, was

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Ivi Daskalaki and Nadina Leivaditi

of diverse actions of “emergency” support and “solidarity” for refugees ( Papataxiarchis 2016a , 2016b , 2016c , 2016d ; Rozakou 2016 ). Following the closure of state borders along the Balkan route and the implementation of the EU

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Wendy Bracewell and Alex Drace-Francis

In writings about travel, the Balkans appear most often as a place travelled to. Western writings about the Balkans revel in the different and the exotic, the violent and the primitive – traits that serve (or so commentators keep saying) as a foil to self-congratulatory definitions of the West as modern, progressive and rational. However, the Balkans have also long been travelled from. The region’s writers have offered accounts of their travels in the West and elsewhere, saying something in the process about themselves and their place in the world.

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Naghmeh Sohrabi and Brian Yothers

Houari Touati, Islam and Travel in the Middle Ages (2010)

Eleftheria Arapoglou, A Bridge Over the Balkans: Demetra Vaka Brown and the Tradition of “Women's Orients“ (2011)

Susan L. Roberson, Antebellum American Women Writers and the Road: American Mobilities (2011)

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Timour Muhidin & Alain Quella-Villéger (eds), Balkans en feu à l’aube du XXe siècle: Romans, nouvelles, reportages St.K. Pavlowitch

Andrew Hammond (ed), The Balkans and the West: Constructing the European Other, 1945–2003 Andi Mihalache

Božidar Jezernik, Wild Europe: The Balkans in the Gaze of Western Travellers Alex Drace-Francis

Santo Cilauro, Tom Gleisner & Rob Sitch, Molvania: A Land Untouched by Modern Dentistry (Jetlag Travel Guide) Katarzyna Murawska-Muthesius

Jean-Yves Conrad, Roumanie, capitale… Paris: Guide des promenades insolites sur les traces des Roumains célèbres de Paris Carmen Popescu

Dervla Murphy, Through the Embers of Chaos: Balkan Journeys Lily Ford