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Shakespeare in Sarajevo

Theatrical and Cinematic Encounters with the Balkans War

Sara Soncini

Albanian and the Macedonian theatre companies that were appointed to perform, respectively, the second and the third part of Henry VI but also, earlier in the process, by the Globe management when commissioning what instantly became branded as theBalkan

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Have You Ever Been in Bosnia?

British Military Travelers in the Balkans since 1992

Catherine Baker

Tens of thousands of British military personnel traveled in former Yugoslavia as peacekeepers between 1992 and 2007. The settlements where British forces established their military presence and supply chain were conceptually far from former Yugoslavia's tourist sites, but military travelers made sense of them by drawing on the commonplaces of previous travel accounts and the lessons of pre-deployment training. British military travelers constructed themselves as often frustrated helpers in Bosnia who struggled with political limitations on their activities but found satisfaction in improving socio-economic relations at the level of the immediate community. For troops, long otiose periods in a stabilizing and startlingly cheap country engendered a touristic sensibility. This article draws on published memoirs and more than fifty new oral history interviews with British peacekeepers and their Bosnian employees to illustrate how British military travelers drew on, perpetuated, and changed the patterns and representation of British travel to the Balkans.

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Meals in Foreign Parts

Food in Writing by Nineteenth-Century British Travellers to the Balkans

Ludmilla Kostova

The interest in the narrative and ideological parameters of travel writing,1 which has been an important feature of the Western European and North American academic contexts over the last fifteen years or so, is undoubtedly a reflection of the unique position of the genre as an area thematising and problematising cultural difference and otherness and as a meeting point of varying discourses of gender, race/ethnicity, class, power, domination and counter-domination. Travel narratives have played a key role in current theoretical debates in postcolonial studies, feminism, cultural studies and comparative literature. To my mind, a considerable number of the critical texts that they have engendered in those fields, appear to privilege a particular analytical strategy focusing on the interpretation of what Laura E. Ciolkowski has termed ‘gender-coded visual power’ (1998: 343). This power operates through the travelling subject’s gaze, which is intent upon the construction of the relatively stationary object(s) of his/her observation. By persistently privileging the analysis of the gaze critics have tended to ignore and even erase other aspects of the complex processes of mediation and negotiation in which travellers and ‘travellees’ are involved.

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Rory Conces

Political realism remains a powerful theoretical framework for thinking about international relations, including the war on terrorism. For Morgenthau and other realists, foreign policy is a matter of national interest defined in terms of power. Some writers view this tenet as weakening, if not severing, realism's link with morality. I take up the contrary view that morality is embedded in realist thought, as well as the possibility of realism being thinly and thickly moralised depending on the moral psychology of the agents. I argue that a prima facie case can be made within a thinly moralised realism for a relatively weak ally like Bosnia to enter the war on terrorism. An inflationary model of morality, however, explains how the moral horror of genocide in an ally's past may lead to a thickened moralised realism such that allied policy-makers question their country's entry into the war.

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Wendy Bracewell and Alex Drace-Francis

In writings about travel, the Balkans appear most often as a place travelled to. Western writings about the Balkans revel in the different and the exotic, the violent and the primitive – traits that serve (or so commentators keep saying) as a foil to self-congratulatory definitions of the West as modern, progressive and rational. However, the Balkans have also long been travelled from. The region’s writers have offered accounts of their travels in the West and elsewhere, saying something in the process about themselves and their place in the world.

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Naghmeh Sohrabi and Brian Yothers

Houari Touati, Islam and Travel in the Middle Ages (2010)

Eleftheria Arapoglou, A Bridge Over the Balkans: Demetra Vaka Brown and the Tradition of “Women's Orients“ (2011)

Susan L. Roberson, Antebellum American Women Writers and the Road: American Mobilities (2011)

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Timour Muhidin & Alain Quella-Villéger (eds), Balkans en feu à l’aube du XXe siècle: Romans, nouvelles, reportages St.K. Pavlowitch

Andrew Hammond (ed), The Balkans and the West: Constructing the European Other, 1945–2003 Andi Mihalache

Božidar Jezernik, Wild Europe: The Balkans in the Gaze of Western Travellers Alex Drace-Francis

Santo Cilauro, Tom Gleisner & Rob Sitch, Molvania: A Land Untouched by Modern Dentistry (Jetlag Travel Guide) Katarzyna Murawska-Muthesius

Jean-Yves Conrad, Roumanie, capitale… Paris: Guide des promenades insolites sur les traces des Roumains célèbres de Paris Carmen Popescu

Dervla Murphy, Through the Embers of Chaos: Balkan Journeys Lily Ford

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Shakespeare and War

Honour at the Stake

Patrick Gray

soldier would be harmless, even fun. I had not been keeping track of events in the Balkans; the only warfare I had really registered in my own lifetime was the first Gulf War, a short-lived, triumphant joyride across Mesopotamia, supported by a near

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“Space without People”

Austro-German Filmmaker, Bestselling Author, and Journalist Colin Ross Discovers Australia

Siegfried Mattl

that led him straight into the Balkan wars as an embedded journalist avant la lettre. The Colin Ross Travel and Adventure Book , published in 1925 and designed by avant-garde artist Jan Tschichold, might serve as an introduction to the remarkable

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Walking to Write

Following Patrick Leigh Fermor across Europe

David Wills

Fermor. However, a few weeks ago I was cheated out of a tennis match by a German” (13). Cameron’s choice of European route is therefore very much improvised, and ends up cutting through the Balkans. In this way, Cameron’s Never Again becomes a homage to