Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 32 items for :

  • "the Balkans" x
  • Regional Studies x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Gendering Balkanisms

Gender, Culture, and Class in Nineteenth-Century Women's Travelogues in the Balkans

Marina Matešić

This article links nineteenth-century travelogues about the Balkans written by European women travelers—Dora d'Istria, Maria Karlova, Emily Strangford, and Paulina Irby and Georgina Mackenzie—both to a broader historical discourse called Balkanism and to the socio-historical contexts of the authors themselves. It examines the ways in which these texts adopted existing hegemonic dichotomies of Balkanism concerning culture, ethnicity/religion, and gender and whether they set new paths for Balkanist discourse. Written during the time of anti-Ottoman uprisings and nation-building movements, the travelogues expressed diverse humanitarian, Christian, feminist, anti-imperial/Turkish and other agendas and discussed the crucial role of (Balkan) women in it. Through a particular focus on domestic life and the lives of women, these women travelers also spoke of their own position in society, bringing to light their struggle for equality in traveling, writing, and participating in broader political and social life, and in that way disturbed the male-centered Balkanist discourse.

Restricted access

An Amazon Warrior, a Chaste Maiden or a Social Man?

Early Ethnographic Accounts of the Balkan Man-Woman

Aleksandra Djajić Horváth

This article looks into the representations of the figure of the Balkan man-woman in missionary and travel accounts from the turn of the twentieth century. I read these early proto-ethnographic texts, both written and visual, dialogically – as points of intersection between observers and the observed, with the aim of addressing the question of how professional transgressors – travellers and missionaries – perceived and culturally ‘translated’ female gender-transgressors who were enjoying the role and status of social men in northern Albanian and Montenegrin societies, and whose gender identity was heavily based on their daily performance of male chores and on the possession of male privileges, such as smoking, socialising with men and wearing arms.

Open access

Women and War in the Balkans

A Comparative Review Essay

Maria Bucur

Alin Ciupală, Bătălia lor: Femeile din România în Primul Război Mondial (Their batt le: Women in Romania during World War I), Iași: Polirom, 2017, 392 pp., 48 illustrations, RON 39.95 (paperback), ISBN: 978-9-73466-577-8.

Jelena Batinić, Women and Yugoslav Partisans: A History of World War II Resistance, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015, 287 pp., 11 illustrations, GBP 24.99 (paperback), ISBN: 978-1-31611-862-7.

Restricted access

Women, Gender and Conflict

Reflecting upon the Gendered Harms of War

Kirsten Campbell

Vesna Nikolić-Ristanović, ed., Women, Violence and War: Wartime Victimization of Refugees in the Balkans, trans. Borislav Radović, Budapest and New York: Central European University Press, 2000, 300 pp., £13.95 (pb), ISBN 978-963-9116-60-3.

Vesna Nikolić-Ristanović, ed., Zene, nasilje i rat (Women, violence, and war), Belgrade: Institut za kriminološka i sociološka istraživanja, 1995, 207 pp., €10.00 (pb), no ISBN mentioned.

Open access

Maria Bucur, Alexandra Ghit, Ayşe Durakbaşa, Ivana Pantelić, Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild, Elizabeth A. Wood, Anna Müller, Galina Goncharova, Zorana Antonijević, Katarzyna Sierakowska, Andrea Feldman, Maria Kokkinou, Alexandra Zavos, Marija M. Bulatović, Siobhán Hearne, and Rayna Gavrilova

: Yale University Press, 2006). Chiara Bonfiglioli, Women and Industry in the Balkans: The Rise and Fall of the Yugoslav Textile Sector , London: I. B. Tauris, 2020, 232 pp., £85 (hardback), ISBN: 978-1-78533-598-3. Book review by Alexandra

Restricted access

Anna Bara and Sveta Yamin-Pasternak

new wave of interest in the occult in Russia. With a specific focus on medical and health magic, a contribution by Sarah Rafijovic examines ethno-medical practices in Serbia in the context of medical pluralism in the Balkans, while a chapter by Anna

Open access

Lines in the Sacred Landscape

The Entanglement of Roads, Resources, and Informal Practices in Buriatiia

Anna Varfolomeeva

-Border Infrastructures in the Balkans . Manchester : Manchester University Press . Dalakoglou , Dimitris , and Penny Harvey . 2015 . “ Roads and Anthropology: Ethnographic Perspectives on Space, Time and (Im)Mobility .” In Roads and Anthropology: Ethnography

Restricted access

Two Patterns of Modernization

An Analysis of the Ethnic Issue in Israel

Shlomo Fischer

model of Eastern European Jewry, Mizrahi Jews were seen as ‘primitives’ in a pre-technological stage. In reality, the coastal cities of North Africa, as well as the Balkan lands (including Turkey) and the urban centers of Syria and Iraq, were no more

Restricted access

Sephardi Leadership in Israel

Transitioning from Mandate to Statehood

Moshe Naor

Mizrahi Jews. In order to extend its own ranks, the Guard encouraged the cooperation of Sephardi Jewish immigrants from Turkey, Greece, and the Balkans. 7 These communities were prominent not only in terms of the composition of the Council of the Sephardi

Restricted access

Liberalism in Israel

Between the ‘Good Person’ and the ‘Bad Citizen’

Menachem Mautner

of the Jews of Asia, Africa, and the Balkans to the Zionist project. Specifically, the petitioners argued that since the series’ starting point was the 1890s, it ignored the fact that Mizrahi Jews had persevered in immigrating to Palestine over many