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Ivi Daskalaki and Nadina Leivaditi

of diverse actions of “emergency” support and “solidarity” for refugees ( Papataxiarchis 2016a , 2016b , 2016c , 2016d ; Rozakou 2016 ). Following the closure of state borders along the Balkan route and the implementation of the EU

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Volunteering as Protest

Against State Failure or the State Itself?

Jan Křeček

Although the Czech Republic (CR) is not a favorite destination nor even a transit country for migrants through Europe, the refugee crisis has materialized into a strict state policy of rejection. The CR rejects proposals for European solutions and detains and imprisons immigrants, most of whom are inadvertently arrived there. This preliminary refusal strategy is peculiar to both the political and media spheres (and public opinion) and is described in the opening sections of this work. However, the CR, is also a country in which the tally of immigrants is less than the number of Czechs citizens traveling beyond their national borders to help refugees congregating along the “Balkan Route”, where they frequently outnumber volunteers from other countries. This paper goes on to describe the development of these grassroots Czech volunteer organizations and activities in 2015. From the beginning it was characterized by spontaneity and a lack of hierarchy, with the Internet and social media playing a vital role during mobilization and organization. The methodological section defines how this sample was analyzed and the manner in which it was dealt. Section five summarizes the most important findings of the case study: (1) the results of a questionnaire survey among volunteers, (2) the results of a qualitative content analysis of their communication in social networks. Besides basic mapping steps (features of volunteer’s participation), the analysis attempts to capture motivations for volunteer’s participation. Comparison with selected motivation typologies emphasizes the protective (later the normative) motivation, on which the hypotheses are based regarding the dispute about the national identity of volunteering as an ideological, and therefore foreseeable, dispute.

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Jytte Klausen, The Islamic Challenge. Politics and Religion in Western Europe (Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 2005).

Reviewed by Joyce Mushaben

David Art, The Politics of the Nazi Past in Germany and Austria (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006)

Reviewed by Antonis Ellinas

Michael Bernhard, Institutions and the Fate of Democracy: Germany and Poland in the 20th Century (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2005))

Reviewed by John Bendix

Brian Rathbun, Partisan Interventions: European Party Politics and Peace Enforcement in the Balkans (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2004).

Reviewed by Charles King

Judd Stitziel, Fashioning Socialism: Clothing, Politics and Consumer Culture in East Germany (New York: Berg, 2005).

Reviewed by Catherine Plum

Cindy Skach, Borrowing Constitutional Designs: Constitutional Law in Weimar Germany and the French Fifth Republic, (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005).

Reviewed by Michael Bernhard

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Introduction

Religious Plurality, Interreligious Pluralism, and Spatialities of Religious Difference

Jeremy F. Walton and Neena Mahadev

The introduction to this special section foregrounds the key distinction between ‘religious plurality’ and ‘interreligious pluralism’. Building from the example of a recent controversy over an exhibition on shared religious sites in Thessaloniki, Greece, we analyze the ways in which advocates and adversaries of pluralism alternately place minority religions at the center or attempt to relegate them to the margins of visual, spatial, and political fields. To establish the conceptual scaffolding that supports this special section, we engage the complex relations that govern the operations of state and civil society, sacrality and secularity, as well as spectacular acts of disavowal that simultaneously coincide with everyday multiplicities in the shared use of space. We conclude with brief summaries of the four articles that site religious plurality and interreligious pluralism in the diverse contexts of Brazil, Russia, Sri Lanka, and the Balkans.

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Srdja Popović and Slobodan Djinovic

–4 ; Nepstad 2011 ). We came of age as activists in Serbia, a country that was widely known for President Slobodan Milošević’s atrocities. When we founded the Otpor! organization against the “Butcher of the Balkans,” the situation was desperate. The vast

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Violence and Identification

Everyday Ethnic Identity in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Torsten Kolind

of tolerance on the national level , and identification with the Balkans and Europe on the global level . The general picture that emerges through these three identifications is that people used and molded already existing categories of identity to

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Introduction

Post-Conflict Dynamics in Bosnia-Herzegovina: Identities, Nationalization, and Missing Bodies

Katerina Seraïdari

Relations in Turkey and in the Balkans, 1500–2000 . Muenster : Lit Verlag . Leutloff-Grandits , Carolin . 2006 . Claiming Ownership in Postwar Croatia: The Dynamics of Property in the Knin Region . Muenster : Lit Verlag . Loizos , Peter . 1988

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Fighting Fire with Fire

Resistance to Transitional Justice in Bahrain

Ciara O’Loughlin

justice.” Drawing on the experience of the Balkans, Subotić argues that states often “hijack” the international transitional justice norm and its institutional embodiments for very different domestic political purposes. In the case of the Balkans, Subotić

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Liminality and Missing Persons

Encountering the Missing in Postwar Bosnia-Herzegovina

Laura Huttunen

nature of the liminality of the missing in social terms. However, the centrality of the “international community” in initiating and funding these efforts in Bosnia, and in the Balkans more generally, reflects the extent to which those in power in the area

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Catherine Plum, Klaus Berghahn, Gregory Smulewicz-Zucker, David Freis, and Matthew Eckel

the back cover Illies call his book “1913: Die Geschichte eines ungeheuren Jahres,” which characterizes its narrative much better than the original subtitle. 1913 was indeed a monstrous year that overshadowed the whole twentieth century. In the Balkan