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Reading Production and Culture

UK Teen Girl Comics from 1955 to 1960

Joan Ormrod

(1991) argues, they were represented as more realistic and normal whereas the glamor of American female stars in contemporaneous films was regarded as wasteful and unpatriotic; in this way, stardom was aligned to national values and identity. In Britain

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Miniature Bride or Little Girl Religious

First Communion Clothing in Post-war Spanish Culture and Society

Jessamy Harvey

The tradition of religious clothing for children is relatively unexplored: this article develops the premise that debates about the links between the sacred and the market go deeper than concern about consumption, and bring to the surface issues of identity. Through exploring the historical development of the First Communion, not as religious ritual but as Catholic consumer culture, the article turns to analyse girls' communicant dress in Spain between the 1940s and 1960s which were the early decades of a dictatorial Regime (1939 to 1975) marked by an ideology of National-Catholicism. General Francisco Franco y Bahamonde, leader of the military rebellion against the elected government in 1936, ruled Spain until his death. One of my aims is to correct a tendency to make the little girl dressed in bridal wear the most visible sign because to do so disregards the cultural practice of wearing clothing to perform piety, signal a vocation or express gratitude for religious intercession.

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Solveig Roth and Dagny Stuedahl

possibilities ( Kavli and Nadim 2009 ). In this article, we explore ethnic-minority girls’ identity processes and educational trajectories with a view to enhancing understanding of these so that schools can support them more effectively. We consider the ways in

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Authenticity and Aspiration

Exploring the CBBC Television Tween

Sarah Godfrey

the complexities of the tween as a key representational paradigm of contemporary, young, postfeminist British femininity, following Jeanette Steemers (2004) , I am not suggesting that cultural and national identities are synonymous or homogeneous

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Melanie Kennedy and Natalie Coulter

brand identity of Akubra which positions itself as a symbol of nationhood founded on family values and the formation of a national culture. As Sarah Projansky says of the girl star, here Dolly “is a promise of the continued dominance of whiteness” (2014

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Claudia Mitchell

television shows that embody a national discourse of ordinariness in their presentations of tweens, and conversations about quite different American ones directed at tweens, along with the collection of qualitative data on the uses of media. The analysis of

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Girls’ Work in a Rural Intercultural Setting

Formative Experiences and Identity in Peasant Childhood

Ana Padawer

This article is based on ethnographic research I started in 2008 as part of a team studying formative experience and identity among different ethnic groups in Argentina ( Novaro 2011 ). I selected San Ignacio 1 for my fieldwork because this rural

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“For Girls to Feel Safe”

Community Engineering for Sexual Assault Prevention

Day Greenberg and Angela Calabrese Barton

futures, they can do more than build STEM expertise for themselves—they can achieve and claim ownership of their own identity development and empowerment. Acknowledgments This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under

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Nirmala Erevelles

this context that she examines, through national and international social policies, autobiographical narratives, religious and cultural mores, and social and psychological theories the changing ways in which ability and disability as social constructs

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Sami Schalk

operates in the contemporary fictional books and doll accessories of the American Girl brand through the combined gendered discourses of education, empowerment, and national identity. I argue that disability’s inclusion in the brand is a means of touting