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Mohamed Assaf and Kate Clanchy

ABSTRACT

Five poems written by Mohamed Assaf (a young Syrian boy who currently lives in Oxford with his family and studies at Oxford Spires Academy) under the mentorship of the poet Kate Clanchy. The introduction and poems themselves offer a reflection on Mohamed’s old and new place(s) in the world, and the signifi cance of writing as a way of responding to, and resisting, “refugeedom.”

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Imperial Mobility

Circulation as History in East Asia under Empire

Kate McDonald

Histories of modern mobility often assume that modern forms of movement arrived in East Asia as part of a universal process of historical development. This article shows that the valorization of modern mobility in East Asia emerged out of the specific context of Euro-American imperial encroachment and Japanese imperial expansion. Through an examination of the tropes of opening and connecting, the article argues that the mobility of the modern can be understood as an “imperial” mobility in two senses: one, as a key component in European, American, and Japanese arguments for the legitimacy of empire; and two, as a global theory of history that constituted circulation as a measure of historical difference.

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Ovarian Psycos

An Urban Cadence of Power and Precarity

Jennifer Ruth Hosek

Ovarian Psycos , USA, 2016, produced, directed, and written by Joanna So kolowski and Kate Trumbull-LaValle, starring the Ovarian Psycos Cycle Brigade, 1h 12m, available on DVD soon. Joanna Sokolowski and Kate Trumbull-LaValle’s documentary

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Introduction

Print Culture, Mobility, and The Pacific, 1920–1950

Victoria Kuttainen and Susann Liebich

geographies and concerns, and strived to participate in a global culture of modernity. Kate Macdonald and Christoph Singer have recently identified elements of the middlebrow as a cultural category already emerging at the turn of the twentieth century. Yet

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Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh and Mette Louise Berg

-based contributions, the inaugural issue also includes a Creative Encounters section curated by Yousif M. Qasmiyeh, including poetic and visual pieces by Theophilus Kwek, Tahmineh Hooshyar Emami, and Mohammad Assaf and Kate Clanchy. Finally, we have a suite of book

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Noncitizens’ Rights

Moving beyond Migrants’ Rights

Sin Yee Koh

the country, the local citizen spouse may not be able to pass on his/her citizenship to their child. References Botterill , Kate . 2017 . “ Discordant Lifestyle Mobilities in East Asia: Privilege and Precarity of British Retirement in

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Worldly Tastes

Mobility and the Geographical Imaginaries of Interwar Australian Magazines

Victoria Kuttainen and Susann Liebich

Humble have separately noted. 17 Yet, recent scholarship has begun to extend the category of the middlebrow to midrange, masculine, nonfiction writing and its readerships. Kate Macdonald has observed that in the interwar period, the cultural values of

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“That’s Where I First Saw the Water”

Mobilizing Children’s Voices in UK Flood Risk Management

Alison Lloyd Williams, Amanda Bingley, Marion Walker, Maggie Mort, and Virginia Howells

: Recovery and Resilience” project, Lancaster University and Save the Children, 2015, http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/cyp-floodrecovery/outputs . 55 See Marion Walker, Rebecca Whittle, William Medd, Kate Burningham, Jo Moran-Ellis, and Sue Tapsell, Children and

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Representing Sanctuary

On Flatness and Aki Kaurismäki's Le Havre

Vinh Nguyen

of cinematic representations of refugees as victims see Ipek A. Celik-Rappas (2017) . 9 See, for example, Philippe Falardeau's The Good Lie (2014) , Jenny Erpenbeck's Go, Went, Gone (2015) , and Kate Evans’ Threads: From the Refugee Crisis

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Mobilizing Disability Studies

A Critical Perspective

Kudzai Matereke

experiences of people have to be considered. For people with disabilities, like the Melbourne towers residents, the touted slogan for the COVID-19 campaign “we are all in this together” sounds far-fetched. This is because, as Gerard Goggin and Kate Ellis