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Noncitizens’ Rights

Moving beyond Migrants’ Rights

Sin Yee Koh

, skilled migrants, expatriates, and ethnic minority diasporic communities in Malaysia and Brunei. Writing this essay has given me an opportunity to reflect on the common theme underlying these research and teaching endeavors—that of differential rights

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Expat, Local, and Refugee

“Studying Up” the Global Division of Labor and Mobility in the Humanitarian Industry in Jordan

Reem Farah

Jordan's socioeconomic issues, such as “driving up housing costs, forcing down wages, and increasing unemployment among Jordanians” ( Zyck and Armstrong 2014: 6 ). At the same time, an unprecedented influx of expatriate humanitarians arrived to address

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Being and Belonging in Kuwait

Expatriates, Stateless Peoples and the Politics of Citizenship

Nadia Eldemerdash

In this article I examine why Kuwait and other migrant-receiving countries in the Persian Gulf have failed to enfranchise migrant workers and their descendants through citizenship. I contend that the increasing exclusion of expatriate workers from these societies can be understood in comparison with the disenfranchisement of the stateless populations to which these governments are host. I argue that nationalist narratives that portray these groups as threatening to the host societies have been extremely significant in creating an atmosphere of increasing isolation and exclusion for both expatriates and stateless peoples. I conclude by examining what the Kuwaiti case tells us about how notions of membership and belonging develop and the significant role of historic and political circumstances in shaping these notions.

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Federica Tarabusi

institutions, as well as the comings and goings of foreign “expatriates” 3 ( stranci in Bosnian), have permeated the cultural intimacy ( Herzfeld 1997 ) of the country and its inhabitants. Such collective perceptions on the part of Bosnian citizens of their

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Five Thousand, 5,000, and Five Thousands

Disentangling Ruble Quantities and Qualities

Sandy Ross

escalated in Crimea and oil prices plummeted, many expatriates in Moscow—along with financial analysts abroad—scrutinized foreign exchange rates like diviners peering into the entrails of a sacrificial beast. Poor exchange rates against the US dollar and the

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Ruin of Empire

The Uganda Railway and Memory Work in Kenya

Norman Aselmeyer

, their attempts to direct Kenyan memory converged and reinforced each other. In what follows, I will briefly portray the “memory work” of each group. White Expatriates The first group who promoted a specific memory of the Uganda Railway were British

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“The Dragon Can't Roar”

Analysis of British Expatriate Masculinity in Yusuf Dawood's One Life Too Many

Antony Mukasa Mate

Yusuf Dawood's One Life Too Many (1987) is a poignant exploration of the life of British expatriate Sydney Walker in colonial and postcolonial Kenya. The text epitomizes the nexus between power and masculinity through the rise and fall of the

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Ben Herzog

This article investigates the debates on expatriation policies after the establishment of Israel as an independent state in 1948. It shows that citizenship is a contingent political construction rather than an intrinsic national tradition. During the first years of its existence, the exact formulation of the type of citizenship in Israel was not fully established. Although scholars of the Israeli state claim that ethnicity dictated the formulation of Israeli rule, it was the desire to build a modern and democratic state that was the basis for naturalization and expatriation in Israel. The article argues that the resolution to allow multiple citizenships was pragmatic rather than ideological. It shows that in Israel, this policy was not derived from a post-national ideology but from the need to recruit more Jewish immigrants from affluent countries.

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Autobiography, Journalism, and Controversy

Freya Stark's Baghdad Sketches

Mary Henes

This article examines Freya Stark's life-writing over a forty-year period in order to shed light on her experience of Baghdad from 1929 to 1933. The article focuses on Stark's resistance to expected feminine norms of the British community, and contextualizes her experience alongside that of Gertrude Bell and Stefana Drower. Stark's experiences, and those of Drower, reveal the ways in which British women resisted the mundane expatriate lifestyle, and gained a great deal of cultural understanding though their interaction with Iraqis. Furthermore, the article discusses Stark's work at the Baghdad Times, a literary apprenticeship that also led to the publication of Baghdad Sketches. The article not only highlights the plurality of autobiographical presentation characteristic of Stark's oeuvre, but also reveals how Stark refashioned her experiences throughout her life, taking into account her changing status and the different political and cultural climates in which the works were published.