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Tanja Carstensen

In the course of sociological research about the Internet, an accompanying range of new methodological approaches have been developed to investigate usage, communication, processes of appropriation, and the virtuality of the Internet. However, the exploration of the Internet as a technological and material object as well as the question of how it is involved in human practices are seen more rarely. This paper presents a methodology of software-based recording and an analysis of the interactions between humans and the Internet, which are visible on the screen. Adding methods of usability and market research to sociological Internet research, this enables us to “move closer” to the technology and to get a detailed view of human practices and Internet “actions” on the interface; therewith, it will be possible to investigate how social practices proceed when Internet technologies are involved, how users handle the Internet and to what extent it enables, facilitates, limits, or hinders practices.

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Françoise Bartiaux and Luis Reátegui Salmón

Based on empirical data on “green” practices according to household size, this article questions the role, if any, given to close personal relationships by social practice theories in sustaining or not daily life practices. Data are mainly drawn from an Internet survey conducted in Belgium in 2006 by WWF-Belgium on daily practices, related to food, energy consumption, mobility, and tourism. Results show that smaller households carry out more numerous “green” practices than larger ones. The concluding discussion underlines the relevance of including social interactions—namely within the household—into the conceptual framework derived from the social theories of practices, to take into account the rearticulating role of social interactions and domestic power claims when carrying out a practice or a set of practices, and when changing it.

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William T. van Markham and C.S.A. (Kris) Koppen

This article investigates the messages about climate change that ten nature protection organizations in Germany, the Netherlands, and the United States communicate to their members and the public through their Internet sites, member magazines, and annual reports. Based on analysis of this content, we conclude that all the organizations address climate change, but to varying extents and in differing ways. All of the organizations note that climate change is a major problem, has a significant impact on nature, and should be addressed mainly via mitigation. With the partial exception of the Dutch groups, all also inform their members about domestic climate change politics. Other themes, including international dimensions of climate change, adaptation to climate change, consumer behavior, collaboration with and criticism of business, and efforts to pressure business or government received less emphasis overall. How much emphasis the organizations gave these themes was conditioned by their traditions, constituencies, national context, and international affiliations.

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Jaime Moreno Tejada

the internet. This is a new avenue of research in media studies (see e.g. Parikka 2015 ). The focus is on the tangible side of media—the unhip technologies, the untidy environments—and, in this case, on the actions of the so-called producer . Not

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Mark C. J. Stoddart and Paula Graham

). First, we carried out an internet ethnography of web content related to Newfoundland tourism produced by the provincial government, tourism operators and promoters, environmental organizations, and recreational associations. During March 2011, a

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Hannah Swee

“Google it” on her mobile phone. After a few minutes, she had announced the results of her Internet search, and consequently, several women found out that they lived in what is termed the “red zone,” in other words an area with a high risk of being

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The Incredible Edible Movement

People Power, Adaptation, and Challenges in Rennes (France) and Montreal (Canada)

Giulia Giacchè and Lya Porto

discovered IE through the website of Transition Towns and then started to focus more on the IE philosophy on the Internet. In September 2012, he created a Facebook page for IE Rennes. In the same year, the current Rennes IE “coordinator” discovered IE via the

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Humans, Plants, and Networks

A Critical Review

Laura Calvet-Mir and Matthieu Salpeteur

related to the transmission of knowledge in these two domains, including both human alters and non-human sources of knowledge (such as books or the internet). By comparing the size and composition of the personal networks of sources of knowledge, they show

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Karen Hébert, Joshua Mullenite, Alka Sabharwal, David Kneas, Irena Leisbet Ceridwen Connon, Peter van Dommelen, Cameron Hu, Brittney Hammons, and Natasha Zaretsky

ideology represented a withdrawal from the political arena. This was facilitated by peakists’ heavy reliance on the Internet, a technology whose history is bound up institutionally and ideologically with the spread of libertarian ideals. While many scholars

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Rethinking Adaptation

Emotions, Evolution, and Climate Change

Debra J. Davidson

states they observe in others, even between strangers, and remotely through internet exchange (e.g., Alshamsi et al. 2015 ; Coviello et al. 2014 ; Guillory et al. 2011 ). Other researchers point to the amplification of shared emotions in response to