Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 14 of 14 items for

  • Author: Michaela Benson x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Michaela Benson

Anthropology in Action is always happy to hear from potential reviewers at all stages in their academic careers. We welcome reviews of around 500 words for a single book, but we are also keen to include reviews comparing two or more works, for which the word length is negotiable. We currently have a number of books awaiting review. If you are interested in reviewing any of the books on the list below, please contact the reviews editor, Michaela Benson (M.Benson@bristol.ac.uk). However, please also be aware that we can request recent publications (within the last year) from publishers, so please feel free to let us know of any books that you would like to review within the field of applied anthropology, and we will do our best to get them for you.

Free access

Michaela Benson

The current list of books for review includes some of the most exciting new books in applied anthropology to be published this year. Please take a close look and if there is anything that you particularly want to review, let us know!

Free access

Michaela Benson

The current list of books for review includes some of the most exciting new books in applied anthropology to be published this year. Please take a close look and if there is anything that you particularly want to review, let us know!

Free access

Nothing in Return?

Distinctions between Gift and Commodity in Contemporary Societies

Michaela Benson and Denise Carter

According to Mauss’ seminal works, it was through obligations laid bare by the gift exchange process—the obligation to give, receive and reciprocate—that pre-modern societies were symbolically reproduced. Mauss’ distinction between those early societies and the encroaching capitalist world has led to questions about whether gift exchange can play a similar role in today’s highly individualised and impersonal contemporary societies. In addition, it has also stimulated a great deal of debate about the relationship between gifts and commodities. If, as many theorists suggest, commodities are a central feature of daily life in capitalist societies, there is the possibility of fluidity between gift and commodity. This invites several interesting questions about the forms and functions of exchange: what forms does exchange take in contemporary societies; what implications, if any, do these forms of exchange have for relationships in contemporary society; and, does gift exchange still have a function in society?