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History as Epic

A Visit to the National Museum of Air and Space in Chile

Rodrigo Booth

National Museum of Air and Space, Pedro Aguirre Cerda Avenue 5000, Cerrillos, Santiago, Chile Admission: Free www.museoaeronautico.gob.cl Open: Tuesday to Sunday 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

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Rodrigo Booth

In 1984 the successful Chilean punk rock band Los Prisioneros identified Latin America as “an exotic place to visit”. Written in a strongly anti-imperialist key, the song “Latinoamerica es un pueblo al sur de Estados Unidos” (“Latin America is a village to the south of the United States”) said about tourism in the continent: For tourists and curious people, / it is an exotic place to visit. / It is only a cheap

place, / but inappropriate to live there. / Latin America offers, / the Rio’s Carnival and the Aztec Ruins, / dirty people wandering around in the streets, / ready to sell themselves for some US dollars.

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Dhan Zunino Singh, Tomás Errázuriz, Rodrigo Booth, and Melina Piglia

For more than a decade a group of scholars has tried to reconstruct and analyze the history of mobilities in Latin America. Meetings such as the T2M annual conference and rich collaborative projects and publications have fostered a common approach to this work, a method built upon theoretical and methodological approaches as much as a common “sensibility” toward mobilities. Without being fully aware of his position, Guillermo Giucci has been an invaluable member of this group. Although distance and other circumstances have prevented his direct participation in the meetings mentioned above, his work has nonetheless traversed the region, capturing the attention of fellow mobility scholars and becoming an essential reference for most ongoing work. Giucci’s influential position stems from his willingness to study subjects that few of his colleagues have grappled with and to break with the typical isolation and lack of comparative research found in Latin American mobility history.