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Alexander D. King

I wish to point out that Roy Chan’s article in the issue 3 of volume 10 (“Broken Tongues: Race, Sacrifice, and Geopolitics in the Far East in Vsevolod Ivanov’s Bronepoezd No. 14-69”) may present some ambiguity for readers as he omitted Ivanov’s patronymic Viacheslavovich. The other literary Vsevolod Ivanov, who lived in China (1922–1945), was named Vsevolod Nikanorovich Ivanov, and he was not the author discussed by Dr. Chan. Thanks to Patricia Polansky for pointing this out to me.

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Alexander D. King

This project is titled “Koryak Ethnopoetics: Stories from Herders and Maritime Villagers” and emerges from my long interest in oral narratives in Koryak. It is funded by a grant from the Endangered Language Documentation Project (ELDP).1 The general goal of the project is to document spoken Koryak, especially oral narratives, primarily by speakers of less studied dialects. Koryak varies quite a bit from one dialect to another, and this project will provide a better set of linguistic data for Koryak. In my previous fieldwork, I found that many people wanted me to share the realities of their traditions, their stories, their lives with the wider world. More Koryaks are concerned about having their name spelled correctly in my publications than being anonymous. This documentation project is ultimately about addressing the inequalities of voice as discussed by Dell Hymes (1996). I have found it rare that my academic research makes a real difference in people’s lives. However, that is exactly the feeling I got when talking to Koryaks about our documentation project in northern Kamchatka; it is work that makes a difference for many people in Kamchatka. Indigenous Kamchatkans face great struggles to have their voices heard but soon there will be an open and easily accessible archive of nearly 200 hours of what they want to say. The majority of participants we recorded had the goal of putting their native born language on record. They wanted their language, the language that their grandchildren don’t understand, recorded so that someone, anyone could hear it even after their death. Most people we approached had a clear sense of legacy. A few treasured the opportunity to speak with with my research partner, who was an excellent conversational partner in Koryak and is honestly interested in what the elder had to say.

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Alexander D. King

This issue marks the re-launch of our journal with Berghahn after a year’s hiatus in publishing. I would like to thank Vivian Berghahn and her team in the journals division for all their efforts in working with us to continue the journal and improve upon the excellent base established by Alan Wood and Cathryn Brennan. As editor, I coordinate the work of the associate editors, who put in many of the hours necessary to prepare high-quality manuscripts for publication. In volume four, we published short editorial notes that were collectively signed. This manifesto marks the introduction of a new genre to the journal, a substantive editorial intended to provoke discussion on a particular topic. It is authored by a single person, but distributed for comment to the other editors, and although not peer-reviewed, it has at least received some peer discussion before going to press. We will take turns stepping onto the soapbox, and we invite our readers to contribute to discussions, as well. The topic at hand is very broad: the place of Siberian studies in the humanities and sciences generally.

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Introduction

Owning culture

Deema Kaneff and Alexander D. King

'Culture' has become a powerful political symbol and economic resource in the information age, where the development of the service economy (including tourism) provides new opportunities to marginal groups and new challenges to dominant ones. In this introduction the authors explore a number of themes that are developed further in the following articles: the way in which 'culture' is produced, possessed and often transformed into a commodity for the market; the role of such reified culture in relations of power and inequality; the ownership of culture as a tool of identity and nation building. While to date such an interest has been largely limited to indigenous populations, here the discussion is taken a step further by focusing on the relevancy of owning culture in the Eurasian context. This allows us to expand our understanding of cultural property: as a tool available to any group seeking confirmation of an identity perceived to be under threat or as an instrument in the negotiation of a group's position vis-à-vis wider power structures.

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Kendall House, Alexander King and Karl Mertens

Ashild Kolas and Yuanyuan Xie, eds., Reclaiming the Forest: The Ewenki Reindeer Herders of Aoluguya - Reviewed by Kendall House

Erich Kasten and Tjeerd de Graaf, eds., Sustaining Indigenous Knowledge: Learning Tools andCommunity Initiatives for Preserving Endangered Languages and Local Cultural Heritage - Reviewed by Alexander King

Vladimir Davydov, Nikolai Karbainov, Veronica Simonova, and Veronica Tselishcheva Aginskaia Street, Tanets s Ognem i Aliuminivye Strely: Prisvoenie Kul’turnykh Landshaftov - Reviewed by Karl Mertens

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Helen Hundley, Peter Jordon, Alexander D. King, Victor L. Mote and Kathryn Pinnick

David Schimmelpenninck van der Oye, Toward the Rising Sun. Russian Ideologies of Empire and the Path to War with Japan (Dekalb, Ill.: Northern University Press, 2001) 329pp. £31.95 (hb); $42.00 (hb) ISBN 0-87580-276-1 (hb)

Anna Reid, The Shaman’s Coat: A Native History of Siberia (London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 2002) 226pp. £20.00 (hb). ISBN 0-2976-4377-0 (hb)

Kira Van Deusen, Raven and the Rock: Storytelling in Chukotka (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1999) 216pp. £20? (hb) ISBN 0-295-97841-4 (hb) Matthew J. Payne, Stalin’s Railroad: Turksib and the Building of Socialism Victor L. Mote

Matthew J. Payne, Stalin’s Railroad: Turksib and the Building of Socialism (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2001) 384pp. £23.00, ISBN 0-8229-4166-X

Jennifer Considine and William Kerr, The Russian Oil Economy (Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Press, 2002) 360pp. £69.95 (hb), ISBN 1-84064-758-2 (hb)

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David G. Anderson, Judith Nordby, David N. Collins, Alexander King, John Sallnow and Andrew Spencer

Peter Jordan, Material Culture and Sacred Landscape: The Anthropology of the Siberian Khanty (Oxford: Altamira Press, 2003) 320pp. photographs, diagrams, maps, index. £22.95 (pb). ISBN 0-7591-0277-5

Claudine Cohen, The Fate of the Mammoth: Fossils, Myths and History (translated by William Rodarmor) (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002) 298pp. pictures, maps, index. £21.00 (hb). ISBN 0-226-11292

Dendeviin Badarch, Raymond A. Zilinskas and Peter J. Balint, eds, Mongolia Today: Science, Culture, Environment and Development , with a foreword by Natsagiin Bagabandi, President of Mongolia (London: RoutledgeCurzon, 2003) 274pp. £65.00. ISBN 0-7007-1598-3

Sharon Hudgins, The Other Side of Russia: A Slice of Life in Siberia and the Russian Far East (College Station, Tex.: Texas A & M University Press, 2003) 319pp. maps, photographs, bibliographical essay, index. £26.95. ISBN 1- 58544-237-2 (East European Studies, no. 21)

Alice Beck Kehoe, Shamans and Religion: An Anthropological Exploration in Critical Thinking (Prospect Heights, Ill.: Waveland, 2000) 125pp. £12.95 (pb). ISBN 1-57766-162-1; Ronald Hutton, Shamans: Siberian Spirituality and the Western Imagination (London: Hambledon & London, 2001) 220pp. £16.95 (hb). ISBN 1-85285-324-7

Michael J. Bradshaw and Philip Hanson, eds, The Territories of the Russian Federation (London: Europa Publications Limited, 2002) 309pp. £75.00. ISBN 1-85743-142-1

Elena Maslova, A Grammar of Kolyma Yukaghir (Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2002) xviii + 609pp. € 148.00 (hb). ISBN 3-11-017527-4

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Alexander D. King, David G. Anderson, Tatiana Argounova-Low, Cathryn Brennan, Patty A. Gray and Joachim Otto Habeck

This special issue of Sibirica is guest-edited by Joachim Otto Habeck, and the Editors applaud his work to bring together this excellent group of papers resulting from a conference he organized at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Halle, Germany. Dr Habeck is Coordinator of the Siberian Studies Centre at the MPI, which is now well established as a key institution in the anthropology of Siberia. The conference included scholars from several disciplines, and thus publication in Sibirica seemed to be the perfect choice, reflecting the journal’s commitment to cross-disciplinary conversations on the region.

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Alexander D. King, David G. Anderson, Tatiana Argounova-Low, Cathryn Brennan, Patty A. Gray and Joachim Otto Habeck

This issue of Sibirica is the last to be published with Taylor and Francis. The Editors would like to thank Richard Delahunty and Liz Eades at Taylor and Francis for their kind assistance during this difficult time of transition. This issue also marks the last volume for David Collins as Reviews Editor. John Ziker, Boise State University, USA, has taken up the mantel for Volume 5, and all correspondence regarding book reviews should be sent directly to him at JZiker@boisestate.edu.

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Catherine Alexander, Veronica E. Aplenc, August Carbonella, Zaindi Choltaev, Thomas Hylland Eriksen, Paola Filippucci, Christian Giordano, Caroline Humphrey, Deema Kaneff, Alexander D. King, Silke von Lewinski, Michaela Pohl, Hermann Rebel and Zala Volčič

Biographical notes on contributors