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Adapting Brittany

The Ker-Is Legend in Bande Dessinée

Armelle Blin-Rolland

This article examines two bande dessinée versions of the Breton legend of the flooded city of Ker-Is, Robert Lortac’s 1943 À la découverte de Ker-Is (published in children’s magazine O lo lê) and Claude Auclair and Alain Deschamps’s 1981 Bran Ruz. It argues that through the continuation or appropriation of the legend, these comics offer ideologically filtered views of Bretonness and Brittany from two different politico-historical contexts, occupied France and the postcolonial era. The article also analyses how comic art can be used in productive ways to represent Brittany as a stateless culture, including through text-image reiteration or supplementarity, and using the double page for a bilingual parallel textual-visual practice. It concludes by suggesting that the study of internal colonialism and peripheries such as Brittany is an important addition to research into postcolonial comics.

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Armelle Blin-Rolland

This article aims to compare the narrative techniques employed through the combination of text and image in Tardi's adaptations of Le Der des ders and Voyage au bout de la nuit . Le Der des ders is a classic format bande dessinée, and Voyage is a cross-media work where Tardi's uncaptioned illustrations are juxtaposed with Céline's text. We argue that both Le Der des ders and Voyage constitute successful adaptations in their use of the specificity of the media, respectively comic book and illustration. We will look at the narrative use of text and image in Le Der des ders in terms of complementarity, and in terms of fragmentation with regard to Voyage. In Le Der des ders, text and image form one narrative; in Voyage, on the other hand, there is a binary narrative: the text, and, juxtaposed with it, confronting it, its visual version.

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Fidelity versus Appropriation in Comics Adaptation

Jacques Carelman's and Clément Oubrerie's Zazie dans le métro

Armelle Blin-Rolland

Raymond Queneau's 1959 novel Zazie dans le métro has been adapted into two text/image versions, by Jacques Carelman in 1966 and by Clément Oubrerie in 2008. Carelman's version is strongly inscribed in the fidelity discourse, while Oubrerie advocates a process of complete appropriation of the source text by the adapter. This article will explore how the three interrelated aspects of approach to adaptation, text/image combination and readership and reader's experience, shape the transposition of the source text into two strikingly different text/image versions by Carelman and Oubrerie. Focusing on the transposition of the literary voices of the source text, it will discuss the differing manners in which the adapters use the specificity of their chosen medium to make the characters of Zazie dans le métro speak in text and image to their new readers.

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Introduction

Comics and Adaptation

Armelle Blin-Rolland, Guillaume Lecomte and Marc Ripley

This introduction to this special issue of European Comic Art on ‘Comics and Adaptation’ provides a brief overview of the field of adaptation studies, with a particular focus on its considerable developments and expansion since the late 1990s, as it has moved beyond a comparative novel-to-film approach to centre instead around questions of intertextuality and hypertextuality. This special issue aims to contribute to this field and to the growing body of works on comics and adaptation. The authors explore questions of transnational circulation of visual, narrative and generic motifs (Boillat); heteronormalisation and phallogocentrism (Krauthaker and Connolly); authenticity of drawn events (Lecomte); identity in a stateless minoritised culture (Blin-Rolland); ‘high’ and popular culture (Blank); reverence in comic adaptations of the literary canon (de Rooy); and documentary and parody (Ripley).

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Matthew Screech, Susan Slyomovics, Armelle Blin-Rolland and Ana Merino

EXHIBITION REVIEW

Tintin: Hergé’s Masterpiece, Somerset House, London, 12 November 2015 to 31 January 2016

BOOK REVIEWS

Jennifer Howell, The Algerian War in French-Language Comics (Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2015). 222 pp. ISBN: 978-1-4985-1606-8 ($90.00)

Benoît Mitaine, David Roche and Isabelle Schmitt-Pitiot, eds., Bande dessinée et adaptation (littérature, cinéma, tv) (Clermont-Ferrand: Presses Universitaires Blaise-Pascal, 2015). 374 pp. ISBN: 978-2-84516-682-0 (€18.00)

Mel Gibson, Remembered Reading: Memory, Comics and Post-War Construction of British Girlhood (Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2015). 224 pp. ISBN: 9789462700307 (€55.00)

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Bart Beaty, Armelle Blin-Rolland, Rod Cooke, Pierre Fresnault-Deruelle, Thierry Groensteen, Benoît Peeters, Annick Pellegrin, Lawrence R. Schehr, Greice Schneider and Raphaël Taylor

Notes on Contributors to Volume 3