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'Rudely Interrupted'

Shakespeare and Terrorism

Graham Holderness and Bryan Loughrey

On Saturday 19 March, 2005, Omar Ahmed Abdullah Ali tidied his workstation at Qatar Petroleum and shut down his computer for the last time. There were very few people in the offi ce that day, and none of them noticed anything unusual about his behaviour. They recalled him afterwards as ‘a decent man’, a family man whose wife had, only a month before, given birth to their third child. Earlier that morning the 38-year old Egyptian computer programmer had said goodbye to Umm Abdullah and his three children quite normally, as if nothing unusual were about to occur. I am not what I am. Now he left the offi ce quietly, unassumingly, attracting no attention, and went to collect his black Land Cruiser from the company car park. Driving slowly and carefully, he pulled the car onto the road and headed towards the Doha suburb of Fariq Kalaib.

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Bryan Loughrey and Graham Holderness

In its current incarnation, Critical Survey is now thirty years old. We have been its Editors throughout, with the support of our publisher Berghahn Books, a judicious Editorial Board, and the loyalty of readers and subscribers. A celebration of some sort seems in order. We thought it best to remind ourselves of the journal’s founding principles: clarity of exposition; relevance to the curriculum; recognition given to emerging fields of study; and the potential to blend critical with creative voices.

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Bryan Loughrey and Graham Holderness

In October 2016, to mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, the Department of Philology, Literature, Linguistics of the University of Pisa organized a conference on the topic of ‘Shakespeare and Money’. This issue of Critical Survey publishes some of the keynote papers from that conference.

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Bryan Loughrey and Graham Holderness

Brian Cox and Tony Dyson established Critical Survey in 1962. Over its long history, the journal has never before published four issues within a single year. This initiative, it should be stressed, will not be a one-off event; rather it marks a strategic milestone, a precedent signalling that from now on four issues per year will be the journal’s default publication protocol. The main reason for this change is to facilitate ‘widening access’ and greater ‘diversity’. Given that both of these terms have, however, become deracinated, let us make clear what they mean in the context of Critical Survey’s vision, history, operations and future.

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Graham Holderness and Bryan Loughrey

While the articles in this volume are focussed on new research in Hamlet studies, this editorial ‘Afterword’ reverts to an earlier stage of the debate around Q1, specifically the ‘culture wars’ of the 1990s, and re-examines the controversy surrounding the publication of the Shakespearean Originals series, which was launched with a new edition of Hamlet First Quarto (1992). Shakespearean Originals sought to situate texts within the historical conditions of textual production by decomposing conflated modern editions into the various discrete, and to some degree incommensurable, textualisations that were produced by historical contingency in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. A general recovery of such textualisations, as they existed before their colonisation by the modern edition, was at that point in time clearly a priority. Although the series was prompted by ascendant currents in critical theory, the academy was not ready for this particular editorial initiative.

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Bryan Loughrey and Graham Holderness

In this issue, Critical Survey continues to represent international scholarship and research, and to broaden the horizons of scholarship. Featuring authors from Britain, the United States, Australia, Jordan, the Sultanate of Oman and the Republic of Ireland, the issue ranges from early modern to contemporary literature and culture, from Shakespeare to the literature and drama of contemporary Ireland.

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Bryan Loughrey and Graham Holderness

This issue of Critical Survey inaugurates a new chapter in the history of the journal. Founded in 1962 by Brian Cox and Tony Dyson, the journal formed a complement to its sibling Critical Quarterly, publishing creative as well as critical work, and targeted at staff and students in both secondary and tertiary education. Critical Survey ceased publication in 1979, and was re-launched in 1989 under the editorship of Bryan Loughrey, who has now returned as joint Editor with Graham Holderness (formerly General Editor). A new Poetry Editor Ben Parker joins our long-serving colleague John Lucas to manage the Poetry section. We would like to take this opportunity to record our thanks to the distinguished succession of University of Hertfordshire Literature staff who served as Editors between 1992 and 2015 – Professor Andrew Murphy, Dr Carol Banks, Professor Sharon Monteith and Dr Andrew Maunder.

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Bryan Loughrey, Cedric Watts and Deryn Rees-Jones

Sea Buckthorn

Iago’s Motive

Charles Baudelaire: ‘Le Guignon’

From the Archive: Prologue

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Khalid Amine, Mark Bayer, Rafik Darragi, Sameh F. Hanna, Graham Holderness, Margaret Litvin and Bryan Loughrey

Notes on contributors