Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author: Carol Hager x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Carol Hager

The energy revolution poses a fundamental challenge to the German corporatist institutional model. The push for renewables in Germany arose almost entirely outside the prevailing channels of institutional power. Eventually, federal legislation helped support the boom in local energy production that was already underway, and it encouraged the further development of new forms of community investment and citizen participation in energy supply. Recently, the federal government has tried to put the genie back in the bottle by shifting support to large energy producers. But, as this article shows, the energy transition has provided a base for local power that cannot easily be assailed. The debate over German energy policy is becoming a contest between centralized and decentralized models of political and economic power. Prevailing institutionalist theories have difficulty accounting for these developments. I analyze the local development of renewable energy by means of a case study of the Freiburg area in southwestern Germany, which has evolved from a planned nuclear power and fossil fuel center to Germany's “solar region”. Incorporating insights from ecological modernization theory, I show how the locally based push for renewables has grown into a challenge to the direction of German democracy itself.

Restricted access

Jonathan Bach, Heather L. Dichter, Kirkland Alexander Fulk, Alexander Wochnik, Wilko Graf von Hardenberg and Carol Hager

Jon Berndt Olsen, Tailoring Truth: Politicizing the Past and Negotiating Memory in East Germany, 1945-1990 (New York: Berghahn Books, 2015) Reviewed by Jonathan Bach

Micahel Krüger, Christian Becker, and Stefan Nielsen, German Sports, Doping, and Politics: A History of Performance Enhancement (Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2015) Reviewed by Heather L. Dichter

Susanne Rinner. The German Student Movement and the Literary Imagination: Transnational Memories of Protest and Dissent (New York: Berghahn Books, 2013) Reviewed by Kirkland Alexander Fulk

Kristen Kopp, Germany’s Wild East: Constructing Poland as Colonial Space (Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2012) Reviewed by Alexander Wochnik

Sean Ireton and Caroline Schaumann, eds., Heights of Reflection: Mountains in the German Imagination from the Middle Ages to the Twenty-First Century, Studies in German Literature, Linguistics, and Culture (Rochester: Camden House, 2012). Reviewed by Wilko Graf von Hardenberg

Frank Uekötter, The Greenest Nation? A New History of German Environmentalism (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2014). Reviewed by Carol Hager

Restricted access

Myra Marx Ferree, Jeffrey Luppes, Randall Newnham, David Freis, David N. Coury, Carol Hager and Angelika von Wahl

Charity Scribner, After the Red Army Faction: Gender, Culture and Militancy (New York: Columbia University Press, 2015) Reviewed by Myra Marx Ferree

Despina Stratigakos, Hitler at Home (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015) Reviewed by Jeffrey Luppes

Carolin Hilpert, Strategic Cultural Change and the Challenge for Security Policy: Germany and the Bundeswehr’s Deployment to Afghanistan (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) Reviewed by Randall Newnham

Klaus Weinhauer, Anthony McElligott, and Kirsten Heinsohn, ed., Germany 1916–1923: A Revolution in Context (Bielefeld: transcript, 2016) Reviewed by David Freis

Esra Özyürek, Being German, Becoming Muslim: Race, Religion, and Conversion in the New Europe (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2016) Reviewed by David N. Coury

Amy Austin Holmes, Social Unrest and American Military Bases in Turkey and Germany since 1945 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014) Reviewed by Carol Hager

Clayton J. Whisnant, Queer Identities and Politics in Germany: A History 1880-1945 (New York: Harrington Park Press, 2016) Reviewed by Angelika von Wahl

James Bindenagel, Matthias Herdegen, and Karl Kaiser, ed., Internationale Sicherheit im 21. Jahrhundert: Deutschlands internationale Verantwortung (Göttingen: V&R unipress, 2016) Reviewed by Randall Newnham