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The uninvited guest

Soviet Russia, the Far Eastern Republic and the Washington Conference, November 1921 to February 1922

Paul Dukes and Cathryn Brennan

This article seeks partly to redress the neglect of international relations, especially concerning the Far East, in recent Western writing on Soviet Russia. It concentrates on the sequel to the Paris Peace Conference, the Washington Conference of 1921-2, suggesting that Soviet Russia played the role of 'Banquo's ghost' at both meetings. Making use for the most part of documents from the US National Archive, the article concentrates on the problem of bringing the Japanese intervention to an end, with special reference to the use made for this purpose by the Soviet government of the Far Eastern Republic or DVR. The DVR enjoyed considerable success as a 'democratic' buffer state, while its Special Trade Delegation acted as unofficial representative for Soviet Russia at the Washington Conference. As the Japanese intervention came to an end, the DVR was dissolved.

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Cathryn Brennan and Alan Wood

Sibirica’s bibliogenesis lies in a gathering of a dozen or so British academics who shared a common interest in Siberia and the Russian Far East, at the University of Lancaster, UK, in September 1981. That was the first meeting of what came to be called the British Universities Siberian Studies Seminar (BUSSS). Over the next few years the Seminar met on a number of occasions (Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge – 1983, 1984; School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University of London – 1986, 1993; University of Glasgow – 1988, 1989; and Kemerovo, Western Siberia – 1991). During that period, membership of BUSSS grew from the original handful to over two hundred individual and institutional subscribers to the Seminar’s journal Sibirica, in which were regularly published the proceedings of the various conferences, as well as other invited contributions. In all, nine issues appeared, the first five as samizdat publications financially subvented by the then Department of Russian and Soviet Studies at Lancaster University, the next two published under the title Siberica (sic) by the Oregon Historical Society, Portland, Oregon, USA, and the last two by Ryburn Publishing, Keele University Press, UK.

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Alexander D. King, David G. Anderson, Tatiana Argounova-Low, Cathryn Brennan, Patty A. Gray and Joachim Otto Habeck

This special issue of Sibirica is guest-edited by Joachim Otto Habeck, and the Editors applaud his work to bring together this excellent group of papers resulting from a conference he organized at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Halle, Germany. Dr Habeck is Coordinator of the Siberian Studies Centre at the MPI, which is now well established as a key institution in the anthropology of Siberia. The conference included scholars from several disciplines, and thus publication in Sibirica seemed to be the perfect choice, reflecting the journal’s commitment to cross-disciplinary conversations on the region.

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Alexander D. King, David G. Anderson, Tatiana Argounova-Low, Cathryn Brennan, Patty A. Gray and Joachim Otto Habeck

This issue of Sibirica is the last to be published with Taylor and Francis. The Editors would like to thank Richard Delahunty and Liz Eades at Taylor and Francis for their kind assistance during this difficult time of transition. This issue also marks the last volume for David Collins as Reviews Editor. John Ziker, Boise State University, USA, has taken up the mantel for Volume 5, and all correspondence regarding book reviews should be sent directly to him at JZiker@boisestate.edu.