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Ostrom, the commons, and the anthropology of “earthlings” and their atmosphere

Dan Rabinowitz

Elinor Ostrom, joint winner (with Oliver Williamson) of the 2009 Nobel prize in economic sciences, was quickly recognized by anthropologists as an honorary member of the tribe, and as someone whose achievements are a tribute to the discipline (see Baumard 2009; Wutich and Smth 2009). A political scientist by training, Ostrom was not formally trained as an anthropologist or an ethnographer. This notwithstanding, her commitment to empirical field research and her preoccupation since the early 1970s with the role of collective action, trust, and cooperation in arrangements designed to enhance the management of common pool resources (CPRs) repeatedly directed her toward populations (indigenous groups at the margins of states) and issues (institutions designed and operated at the community level) usually associated with anthropology.

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Fifty Years, Five Crossings, More to Come

Dan Rabinowitz

The post 1948 history of the Kirad Bedouins of the Hula valley in Northern Israel is a series of mass border-crossings between Israel, Syria, Jordan and Lebanon. These migrations came concurrently with a staggered process of dispossession, in which the Kirad lost ownership of their ancestral lands, and ended up as diaspora scattered over four states. The upheavals experienced by the Kirad are historicized and analyzed as a ‘small scale diasporic situation’. This, I argue, is an exceedingly widespread situation in a world characterized as ‘glocalized’, in which powerful globalizing trends combine with ethno-national fervor that accentuates territoriality and state borders. The Kirad’s own perception of their world, fragmented and disturbed beyond recognition by impermeable and often hostile state borders since 1948, is contextualized in terms of the analogy between the recent, vivid past, and ancient history, only vaguely remembered and invoked. Wolfe’s (1982) notion that world systems are by no means new phenomena, the place of diachronic reckoning and subjective historical perceptions, and the place of fate and repetition in the Kirad’s identity inform the theoretical trajectory of the analysis.

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Natives with jackets and degrees. Othering, objectification and the role of Palestinians and the role of Palestinians in the co‐existence field in Israel1

DAN RABINOWITZ

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Book Reviews

Dan Rabinowitz, Russell Stone, Guy Ben-Porat, Paul Scham, Wilhelm Kempf, Lior Libman, and Asaf Sharabi