Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author: Daniel Newman x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Automobiles and Socioeconomic Sustainability

Do We Need a Mobility Bill of Rights?

Daniel Newman

Abstract

This article argues for the establishment of a Mobility Bill of Rights. That the current car system is not sustainable in environmental terms has been much discussed in academic circles and is increasingly accepted in wider society, as reflected by governmental attempts at reform. The current trend for remodeling this car system largely involves the substitution of petrol/diesel for potentially more ecologically sound methods of powering the vehicles such as electricity. Attempts to reach environmental sustainability in this manner do little to impact social or economic sustainability and thus will fail to address the triple bottom line. Rather, reliance on automobiles in the present vein may continue trends for mobility-related exclusion. To tackle this, we need a debate on how the transport needs of ordinary people can be met.

Restricted access

New Mobile Methods

The Skateboarder as Contemporary Flâneur

Daniel Newman

G39, an artist-run gallery, is located within a disused and dilapidated warehouse on a run-down side street in Cardiff ’s city center. Th e artists who run the gallery have sought to reclaim the structure as a productive hub and rebuild the community by providing a creative stimulus. Th at approach is epitomized in Barnraising and Bunkers. Th e show explores the various ways in which we build the places in which we live, work, and play, and the manner in which these locations are (re)appropriated by future generations. Th e artists have been tasked with utilizing architectural and physical structures to highlight that the built environment is a process, not a fixed state; growth happens organically at the will of those who live in an area and not under the dictate of architects and urban planners. Th is exhibition, then, draws on the interplay between place and mobility; the sense of being somewhere and a part of something but with the possibility that people, cultures, or even the buildings themselves can move on.

Restricted access

Daniel Newman, Peter Wells, Paul Nieuwenhuis, Ceri Donovan, and Huw Davies

This article considers electric cars as socio-technical experiments in meeting mobility requirements. There have been numerous trials and government incentives to promote such vehicles, but with a notable lack of success. The article thus seeks to address an urgent need to understand such “transition failure,” which may ultimately impact upon how progress is measured in sociotechnical transitions. Presenting results from a recent research project, it is suggested that shared usage models hold greater potential for achieving sustainable personal mobility. It is concluded, however, that multiple niche experiments present a highly complex situation in which cumulative learning is problematic.

Restricted access

Amanda Golby, Laura Janner Klausner, Charles Middleburgh, Jeff Newman, Walter Rothschild, Michael Shire, and Daniel J. Lasker

Langham, Raphael, 250 Years of Convention and Contention: a History of the Board of Deputies of British Jews, 1760-2010, London, Vallentine Mitchell, 2010, 320 pp., ISBN 978-0853039822.

Kahn-Harris, Keith and Gidley, Ben, Turbulent Times: the British Jewish community today, London, Continuum, 2011, 248 pp., ISBN 978-1847144768.

Blue, Lionel, The Godseeker’s Guide, London, New York, Continuum, 2010, 186 pp., ISBN 978-1847-06418-9.

Gryn, Naomi (ed.), Three Minutes of Hope. Hugo Gryn on the God Slot, London, New York, Continuum, 2010, 270 pp., ISBN 978-1-4411-4035-7.

Hoelting, Kurt, The Circumference of Home: One Man’s Yearlong Quest for a Radically Local Life, Cambridge MA, Da Capo Press, 2010, 356pp., ISBN 978-1458758880.

Sznaider, Natan, Jewish Memory and the Cosmopolitan Order, Cambridge, Polity Press, 2011, 205 pp., ISBN 978-0-7456-4796-8.

Gigliotti, Simione, The Train Journey, New York and Oxford, Berghahn Books, 2009, 244 pp., ISBN 978-1-57181-268-1.

Jospe, Raphael, Jewish Philosophy in the Middle Ages, Boston, Academic Studies Press, 2009, $65/$33, 620 pp., ISBN 978-1-934843-09-3/978-1-934843-27-7.

Rynhold, Daniel, An Introduction to Medieval Jewish Philosophy, London/ New York, I.B. Tauris, 2009, £49.50/£16.99, 272 pp., ISBN 978-1-845117- 47-4/978-1-845117-48-1.