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Afterword

So What Is the Anthropology of Buddhism About?

David N. Gellner

ABSTRACT

This afterword considers the history of the subfield of the anthropology of Buddhism in light of the essays in this special section of Religion and Society. Anthropologists have sought to combat conventional assumptions about Buddhism and have long made contributions to the study of Buddhism, the state, nationalism, and politics. As part of a maturing field, they have also made contributions through the study of Buddhism to many other subfields of anthropology, including morality, spirit possession, the emotions, and materiality. It is no longer necessary for the anthropology of Buddhism to be overwhelmingly concerned with the authenticity and identity of its subjects.

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‘If each comes half way’: meeting Tamang women in Nepal by March, Kathryn

DAVID N. GELLNER

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Hinduism. None, one or many?

DAVID N. GELLNER

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Hindu kingship and polity in precolonial India (Cambridge Studies in Indian History and Society) by Peabody, Norbert

DAVID N. GELLNER

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For syncretism. The position of Buddhism in Nepal and Japan compared

DAVID N. GELLNER

àà, I,173.

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Religion, politics, and ritual. Remarks on Geertz and Bloch*

DAVID N. GELLNER

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Studying secularism, practising secularism. Anthropological imperatives

DAVID N. GELLNER

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The nation‐state, class, digital divides and social anthropology

David N. Gellner