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Que reste-t-il de nos amours?

The Expectations of 1989–1991 Revisited

Francisco Martínez

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The Inertia of Collections

Changes against the Grain in the Rosenlew Museum of Pori, Finland

Francisco Martínez

The first aim of this article is to study the persistence of the collection’s positive presentation of Rosenlew’s industrial heritage, and the second is to anthropologically reconsider what kind of knowledge is generated therein through the preservation and display of factory-made artifacts, which give a sense of concreteness and gravitas to the industrial past. By studying the permanent exhibition and the collections of the Rosenlew Museum and by organizing a workshop with schoolchildren, I reveal the presence of various inertia effects. Long-term corporate values continue to influence the development of the museum’s permanent collection not only through the arrangement of industrial artifacts into a collection but also—at a heuristic level—through epistemological frames and the indexing power of the museum assemblage.

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Francisco Martinez

Is fieldwork as anthropologists do it simply a method among others? This article disagrees, drawing on the concept of “serendipity” as introduced by German scholar Ina-Maria Greverus. Beyond the prescribed way of any method, anthropology’s specificity articulates as “discovery”, in this case: an unexpected discovery of remains of the Soviet past in Estonia, through the author’s family life.

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To Whom Does History Belong?

The Theatre of Memory in Post-Soviet Russia, Estonia and Georgia

Francisco Martínez

Abstract

This article discusses different processes of appropriation of history in three former Soviet Republics. It provides a context for the recent historical retrofitting by taking the re-monumentalisation of the past in Estonia, the popularity of pseudo-history in Russia, and the current state of the Stalin museum in Georgia as symptomatic of wider social processes. New forms of convergence are shown between the historical and the political by the replacement, emptying of meaning, and remixability of past symbols. The author concludes that the Soviet world has been put to political and communicative uses as a familiar context to refer to; also that the process of retrofitting historical narratives is not over yet in any of these societies.

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Trespass into the Liminal

Urban Exploration in Estonia

Francisco Martínez and Patrick Laviolette

This article outlines narratives of trespass. It analyses relations between the personal and the social in abandoned urban physical surroundings. Grounded in our own duo-auto-ethnographic encounters with off-limit places, the research examines the classic notion of liminality through a set of prisms that are less than orthodox. It does so by stressing the formative and transformative possibilities of those threshold spaces that often get bypassed, surpassed or trespassed. Through a series of vignettes describing moments of urban exploration in different parts of Estonia, our implicit aim is to unsettle such conceptual categories as risk and adventure, material decay and transgression. Explicitly, we argue for revisiting storytelling tropes such as the flâneur or the stalker, freeing them up from their respective leisure and pastime associations.

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Francisco Martínez, Eva-Maria Walther, Anita Agostini, José Muñoz-Albaladejo, Máiréad Nic Craith, Agata Rejowska and Tobias Köllner

Andreas Bandak and Manpreet Janeja (eds) (2018), Ethnographies of Waiting: Doubt, Hope and Uncertainty (London: Bloomsbury), 232 pp., €90.46. ISBN 9781474280280.

Liene Ozoliņa (2019), Politics of Waiting: Workfare, Post-Soviet Austerity and the Ethics of Freedom (Manchester: Manchester University Press), 160 pp., £80. ISBN 9781526126252.

Giulia Evolvi (2018), Blogging My Religion: Secular, Muslim, and Catholic Media Spaces in Europe (London and New York: Routledge), 174 pp., £110, ISBN 9781138562110.

Valdimar Tr. Hafstein (2018), Making Intangible Heritage: El Condor Pasa and Other Stories from UNESCO (Bloomington: Indiana University Press), 204 pp., $75.00, ISBN9780253037923.

Valdimar Tr. Hafstein and Áslaug Einarsdóttir, directors and producers (2018), The Flight of the Condor: A Letter, a Song and the Story of Intangible Cultural Heritage, 30 min., available online: http://flightofthecondorfilm.com (accessed 22 July 2019).

Morton Nielsen and Nigel Rapport (eds) (2017), The Composition of Anthropology: How Anthropological Texts Are Written (London: Routledge), 202 pp., Pb £25.99, ISBN 9781138208117.

Agnieszka Pasieka (2015), Hierarchy and Pluralism: Living Religious Difference in Catholic Poland (New York: Palgrave Macmillan), 261 pp., €96.29, ISBN 9781137500526.

Detelina Tocheva (2017), Intimate Divisions: Street-Level Orthodoxy in Post-Soviet Russia (Berlin: LIT Verlag), xv + 185 pp., 29.90€, ISBN 9783643908735.