Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author: John Gledhill x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

“The people's oil”

Nationalism, globalization, and the possibility of another country in Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela

John Gledhill

This article examines similarities and differences in the development of the oil industries of Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela through an analysis of the struggles and alliances between their elites, political classes, and diverse popular forces. The analysis demonstrates that although history has produced popular skepticism over the meaning of the state's claim that “our oil belongs to the people,” a popular imaginary of the potential link between national resource sovereignty and social justice has had powerful historical effects. Despite the structural differences between these cases, it remains today at the center of emergent alternatives that cannot be dismissed simply as a return to the populism of the past. While its main significance in Mexico to date has been to impede persistent efforts to privatize the industry, in the cases of Venezuela and Brazil we may now talk of significant possibilities for building a more multipolar world economic order.

Restricted access

John Gledhill, Jane Schneider, Peter Schneider, Ananthakrishnan Aiyer and Cris Shore

On 2 December 2001, four days after its credit rating had been downgraded to

junk bond status, the Enron Corporation of Houston, Texas, filed the biggest

bankruptcy petition in the history of the United States. On the 14 March 2002,

Enron’s accountants, Arthur Anderson, were indicted by a federal grand jury on

the criminal charge of obstruction of justice for “knowingly, intentionally and

corruptly” inducing employees to shred documents relating to Enron. Enron

was thus both a stock market bubble that burst and a perpetrator of frauds that

involved the complicity of many outside the company itself. The fraud element

turned Enron from a flagship of the “new economy” into a “corporate scandal,”

the first of several. By the end of 2002, the distinction of being the United

States’ biggest bankrupt company had passed to the telecoms giant, Worldcom.

When Worldcom’s accounting fraud was originally identified in June 2002, its

scale was estimated at $3.8 billion. Six months later it was clear that the misreporting

was vastly higher, a staggering $9 billion. The New York Times headlined

the affair thus: “The Latest Corporate Scandal is Stunning, Vast and

Simple” (Eichenwald and Romero 2002).

Restricted access

Bruce Kapferer, Marshall Sahlins, Keith Hart, Jonathan Friedman, Allen Feldman, Michael Humphrey, Ibrahim Auode, Michael Rowlands, John Gledhill and Leif Manger

THE WORLD TRADE CENTER AND GLOBAL CRISIS

Bruce Kapferer

AN EMPIRE OF A CERTAIN KIND

Marshall Sahlins

SEPTEMBER 11TH AND AFTER

Keith Hart

FROM NINE-ELEVEN TO SEVEN-ELEVEN

Jonathan Friedman

GROUND ZERO POINT ONE

Allen Feldman

HUMANITARIANISM, TERRORISM AND THE TRANSNATIONAL BORDER

Michael Humphrey

ARAB AMERICANS AND THE CRIMINALIZATION OF DISSENT

Ibrahim Aoude

“MY SON IS A FANATIC” OR HOW TO HAVE THINGS BOTH WAYS IN A HERITAGE DEBATE

Michael Rowlands

JUST WARS, CIVILISATION AND EMPIRE IN POSTMODERNITY

John Gledhill

SEPTEMBER 11 AND OCTOBER 7

Leif Manger

THE NEW LEVIATHAN AND THE CRISIS OF CRITICISM IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES

Bruce Kapferer