Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 73 items for

  • Author: Jonathan Magonet x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Jonathan Magonet

Two rabbis played a major role at a key transitional period in the history of the Leo Baeck College. Eight years after its beginning in 1956 under the auspices of the Reform Synagogues of Great Britain (RSGB) (now Movement for Reform Judaism) it was joined as a co-sponsor by the Union of Liberal and Progressive Synagogues (ULPS) (now Liberal Judaism). Two years later Rabbi Dr Werner van der Zyl, the founder and Hon. Director of Studies retired, to be succeeded in the shared leadership by Rabbi Dr. John Rayner (1924-1995), representing the ULPS, as Hon. Director of Studies, and, in the specially created post of Hon. Registrar, by Rabbi Hugo Gryn (1930-1996), representing the RSGB. Together they oversaw the College’s development until the appointment of Rabbi Dr. Albert Friedlander in 1970. In addition to their administrative tasks, both served as teachers, Rabbi Rayner in the field of rabbinics, and Rabbi Gryn in the area of practical rabbinics. Both had refugee backgrounds but made the U.K. their permanent home, serving as the senior rabbis at the two ‘cathedral synagogues’ of their respective movements, Rayner at the Liberal Jewish Synagogue, St. Johns Wood, and Gryn at the West London Synagogue. Very different in temperament and personality, both made an indelible impact on their congregants, their students and the College itself.

Free access

Jonathan Magonet

The Trialogue Conference is an interdisciplinary conference aiming to bring together the perspectives of literature, psychotherapy and religion. It was established in 1997 and has been held biennially since then. A novel is chosen as the basis for each conference and a theme drawn from it is suggested as a focus for discussion. Three speakers are invited, from a literary, a psychotherapeutic and a religious background. Each speaker gives a paper on the selected text from their own particular perspective. The conference occupies a weekend and is built around these three presentations, together with an introductory talk on the Friday evening by the chair of the conference.

Free access

Jonathan Magonet

The preparation for this issue coincided with a conference in London which also served to launch Anthony Polonsky’s important three-volume work The Jews in Poland and Russia. At the meeting he gave a paper which we reproduce here, originally delivered at Harvard, describing his own personal history and how he became engaged in the study of Polish-Jewish history. It serves also as an introduction to the themes of his book.

Restricted access

Bible Week

The Author's Esther – A Sermon

Jonathan Magonet

If Esther is a secular work of fiction, what can we say about the author’s attitude to his characters? A whimsical sermon.

Free access

Jonathan Magonet

Our policy of alternating themed issues with more general ones means that sometimes contributions that were delayed, or those sent in response to a particular theme, can be placed together in a subsequent issue. Here we have the opportunity to follow up on two significant subjects of recent issues, the ‘Children and Literature’ topic of Spring 2009 and the ‘State of Yiddish’ of Autumn 2009.

Free access

Jonathan Magonet

When speaking about Wendy Greengross at a memorial service shortly after her death, Rabbi Lionel Blue likened her to other exceptional British Jewish women, like the Hon Lily Montagu and Lady Henriques, who were deeply motivated by their religious beliefs and who undertook pioneering work within the Jewish and wider community.

Free access

Jonathan Magonet

The year 2013 sees the fortieth anniversary of the Annual International Jewish- Christian-Muslim Student Conference (JCM) which has been co-sponsored and sustained from its beginning by Leo Baeck College. Created at the Hedwig Dransfeld Haus in Bendorf, then under the direction of Anneliese Debray, it moved to Wuppertal when the Haus closed. The partner organisations have included the Oekumenische Werkstatt (now United Evangelical Mission), Wuppertal, the Bendorfer Forum, the Deutsche Muslim-Liga, Bonn, and the Centre for the Study of Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations, University of Birmingham. Regular financial support has come from the German Ministry of the Interior.

Free access

Jonathan Magonet

It is with great sadness that we record the death after a long illness, on 3 May 2009, of Mme Colette Kessler, one of the leading figures of liberal Judaism in France. She was above all a teacher and educator, responsible for developing the educational programmes at the Union Libéral Israélite (ULI) and subsequently the Mouvement Juif Libéral de France (MJLF) in Paris. But she was also dedicated to developing Jewish-Christian dialogue, participating in innumerable conferences, encounters, studies and religious services. She addressed the World Union for Progressive Judaism Conference in Paris in 1995 on ‘The Urgency of a Jewish Response in the Inter-religious Dialogue’ anticipating by five years the appearance in the United States of ‘Dabru Emet, A Jewish Statement about Christianity’.

Free access

Jonathan Magonet

Now that this issue focusing on Yiddish is completed it seems obvious, at least in retrospect, that this was a relevant and important topic for a journal devoted to themes affecting Jewish life in Europe. This was not so self-evident when the idea began to emerge. An early impetus was the offering of an article some years ago by Haike Beruriah Wiegand, included here, on the writings of Isaac Bashevis Singer. At the time it seemed too specialised and lacking in a context, so it was held in reserve. Another impetus was hearing a lecture on the unexpected topic of ‘Yiddish Tango in Argentina’ by Lloica Czackis, included in this issue, accompanied by her own excellent performances of the songs. That in turn triggered many memories of performances of Yiddish songs in Germany by excellent singers and musicians as diverse as Daniel Kempin, Shura Lipovsky, Roswitha Dasch and Katharina Muetter, the former two Jewish, the latter not, all of whom have undertaken serious research into Yiddish culture and music, and brought commitment and learning, as well as great artistry, to their work. Suddenly the obviousness of the subject became apparent.

Free access

Jonathan Magonet

This issue completes the two devoted to the current state of Ladino studies. The Editorial Board is deeply indebted to Hilary Pomeroy for the scholarship, devotion, and, if she will forgive the lapse into another Jewish language, the sitzfleisch needed to complete the task. None of us anticipated quite how complex the editorial task would be, down to ensuring the correct detailed transliteration of so many Ladino texts. Hilary’s editorial follows showing the broader context within which the articles are located. The issue also contains her own important contribution to the range of studies. Together the two issues form a comprehensive overview of the field.