Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author: Julian Hanich x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Julian Hanich

This article explores the question of what we are actually afraid of when we are scared at the movies. It is usually claimed that our fear derives from our engagement with characters and our participation through thought, simulation, or make-believe in fearful situations of the filmic world. These standard accounts provide part of the explanation why we are afraid—this article complements them by showing that we often literally fear for ourselves as well. Concentrating on an anticipatory subspecies of cinematic fear dubbed “dread,” the article argues that we often fear a negative affective outcome, namely our own fearful experience of shock and/or horror that usually ends scenes of dread. By looking at viewers' action tendencies and actions proper activated in dreadful moments, the article suggests that we appraise scenes of dread as potentially harmful to our current (and even future) psychological well-being. Dread thus turns out to be a specific kind of metaemotion.

Restricted access

How Many Emotions Does Film Studies Need?

A Phenomenological Proposal

Julian Hanich

Abstract

A look at current emotion research in film studies, a field that has been thriving for over three decades, reveals three limitations: (1) Film scholars concentrate strongly on a restricted set of garden-variety emotions—some emotions are therefore neglected. (2) Their understanding of standard emotions is often too monolithic—some subtypes of these emotions are consequently overlooked. (3) The range of existing emotion terms does not seem fine-grained enough to cover the wide range of affective experiences viewers undergo when watching films—a number of emotions might thus be missed. Against this background, the article proposes at least four benefits of introducing a more granular emotion lexicon in film studies. As a remedy, the article suggests paying closer attention to the subjective-experience component of emotions. Here the descriptive method of phenomenology—including its particular subfield phenomenology of emotions—might have useful things to tell film scholars.

Restricted access

Malcolm Turvey, Mette Hjort, Julian Hanich, and Christopher T. Gonzalez

ELEGY FOR THEORY by D.N. RODOWICK

Malcolm Turvey

COGNITIVE MEDIA THEORY by TED NANNICELLI AND PAUL TABERHAM (EDS.)

Mette Hjort

THE FORMS OF THE AFFECTS by EUGENIE BRINKEMA

Julian Hanich

MEX-CINÉ: MEXICAN FILMMAKING, PRODUCTION, AND CONSUMPTION IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY by FREDERICK LUIS ALDAMA

Christopher T. Gonzalez