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Katherine Morris

Gregory McCulloch’s recent book Using Sartre has the laudable aim of treating Being and Nothingness ‘analytically’.1 But, I think, he falls short of fulfilling this aim, and I want to try to bring this out in respect of his interpretation of Sartre’s treatment of the question of the existence of Others. McCulloch’s idea of ‘treating Sartre analytically’ is treating him as ‘one of us’ (US x), by which he says that he means ‘applying analytical techniques and standards of rigour to Sartre’ (Ibid.). ‘Bravo,’ one might say; but in practice, McCulloch slips into a more ordinary use of the expression ‘treating Sartre as one of us’.

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John Gillespie and Katherine Morris

This issue spans the entirety of Sartre’s philosophical life, from his mémoire on images written at the age of twenty-two for his diploma at the Ecole normale supérieure to his thoughts about democracy as expressed in his final interview, Hope Now, at seventy-four. Fittingly enough, in between come reflections on sin and love and on the ageing body. As a result, we can get a sense of how Sartre’s thinking changes and develops throughout his career and is always engaged, right to the end.

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John Gillespie and Katherine Morris

This issue has something of a symposium feel about it: a genuine conversation between some of our most eminent Sartre scholars, which, while clearly not planned this way, turns out to be rather appropriate in these socially distanced times. Whereas recent issues have testified to the breadth of Sartre’s work, the focus this time is on Sartre’s early philosophy, mainly, but not exclusively, on L’Etre et le néant.