Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author: Kingsley Garbett x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Social Analysis

The International Journal of Cultural and Social Practice

Kingsley Garbett

Social Analysis was published for 23 years by the Department of Anthropology, University of Adelaide. From January, 2002 it will now be published in New York by Berghahn Books of New York and Oxford. In recent years, it has encouraged a dialogue within anthropology and especially in that interface between anthropologists and other scholars in the social sciences and humanities. However, the restructuring of the journal and the constitution of a new international editorial committee is intended to situate the journal strongly within debates and issues affecting human populations in all parts of contemporary globalized realities. More than ever the journal is concerned to intervene in the formation of an anthropological critical and empirical gaze relevant to contemporary realities. This intervention is directed to explore the horizons of the possibilities of anthropological analysis and understanding, of what might be described as the anthropological attitude which consistently problematizes every aspect of human social life and existence. The journal in this way seeks to break out of anthropology in a narrow disciplinary sense and to encourage contributions which express an open yet simultaneously rigorous approach to the crises of being human and which are enabled to draw from a great diversity of relevant fields of enquiry.

Full access

Kingsley Garbett

On 4 July 2003, a one-day “Cultural Research and Refugee Studies” workshop was held in Sydney. Greg Gow and Amanda Wise organized the workshop, a cooperative venture between the cultural research centers of the University of Western Sydney and the Australian National University. It brought together a large group of researchers, practitioners, and community representatives to exchange ideas about cultural research among refugees and asylum seekers in Australia. The three articles that follow, by Gow, Wise, and Glazebrook, present a particular perspective on the methodology of studying and analyzing refugee behavior in Cultural Studies, stressing the significance of considering the emotive and affective aspects of their status and position. Wise’s material considers East Timorese refugees, many of whom now have residence in Australia, while Gow and Glazebrook examine more recent refugees and asylum seekers from Iraq and Central Afghanistan, respectively, many of whom still have uncertain futures. Comments from a panel discussion by Khalid Koser, Pnina Werbner, and Ien Ang complete this thematic section.

Full access

Ien Ang, George Baca, Rohan Bastin, Jacob Copeman, Thomas Ernst, Jonathan Friedman, Kingsley Garbett, Diana Glazebrook, Greg Gow, Keith Hart, André Iteanu, Roger Just, Bruce Kapferer, Judith Kapferer, Khalid Koser, Neil Maclean, Jukka Siikala, Amy Stambach, Christopher C. Taylor, Pnina Werbner and Amanda Wise

Notes on Contributors