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Houston (Un)limited

Path-dependent Annexation and Highway Practices in an American Metropolis

Kyle Shelton

How do cities grow? And how do decisions made about mobility and territory impact and structure that growth? Focusing on Houston, Texas after the Second World War, this article looks at how decisions made by city officials helped cement the dual processes of annexation and highway building into the city's growth structure. These strategies, while helping to explain how Houston become a leading metropolitan center during the second half of the twentieth century, also turned into path dependencies that limited Houston's mobility choices and stretched the city's ability to provide services to its citizens. The implementation of these two growth mechanisms shaped the unique development of the city and structured its relationships to the communities around it.

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Kyle Shelton

It is striking how much recent scholarship on the mobility history of the United States has come to emphasize moments of relative motionlessness. More concerned with events in the halls of government than on the open road, historians have moved away from the nuts and bolts of transportation systems—the vehicles, the modes, and the infrastructure—to instead investigate how these networks have been shaped by larger political and social forces. Scholars have investigated these influences by highlighting how groups of Americans have codified, contested, or perceived the nation’s transportation system. By centering their studies on actors, rather than the actual systems, mobility scholars have framed their subjects in new ways and linked their subfield to political, legal, and social history.

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Kyle Shelton

This year’s Mobility in History is the sixth edition of the T2M Yearbook. With this volume a new editorial team has taken over with plans to carry on the strong tradition created by the preceding teams led by Gijs Mom and Peter Norton. Yearbook Six once again offers a collection of articles reviewing the cutting edge of mobility scholarship across several disciplines and highlighting exciting new directions toward which this vibrant field can move. In addition, this yearbook features two articles, by Dhan Zunino Singh and Christian Kehrt, that represent the first iterations of what are intended to become annual features in future volumes.

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Kyle Shelton

What good are mobility scholars? And what does our scholarship—be it rooted in history, geography, sociology, anthropology, or any other discipline—provide the world outside academia? Those are questions I have been pondering for the last year, ever since Gijs Mom and Peter Merriman engaged in a stimulating polemic in the pages of Yearbook Six. Must we move beyond our academic silos, as Mom suggested, and peek (if not step boldly) into interdisciplinary work and even policy? Can the scholar be a planner or policy maker? Can the historian offer insights on the future of mobility? And what of our subjects? Should our gaze be turned to the international? The comparative? Or, as Merriman argued, should we polish well-trod national mobilities in ways that allow new subjects, local particularities, and actors to shine through?

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Kyle Shelton

This is the eighth issue of Mobility in History. It is also the last issue that will appear as a stand-alone journal. While no new versions of the publication will be created in the existing mold, the publication and the types of work it has published over nearly a decade of production are far from disappearing. Elements of the Yearbook will become an essential part of T2M’s website, providing a key interface between the organization, its members, and the public. Further, with a strong stable of publications in operation, some articles traditionally found in Mobility in History may have landing spots in Transfers and The Journal of Transport History. Finally, back issues of Mobility in History will remain accessible to members in perpetuity, providing a meaningful archive of work.

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James Longhurst, Sheila Dwyer, John Lennon, Zhenhua Chen, Rudi Volti, Gopalan Balachandran, Katarina Gephardt, Mathieu Flonneau, Kyle Shelton and Fiona Wilkie

Book Reviews

Peter Cox, ed. Cycling Cultures (Chester, UK: University of Chester, 2015) - James Longhurst

Daniel Owen Spence, Colonial Naval Culture and British Imperialism, 1922–67 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015) - Sheila Dwyer

Colin Divall, ed., Cultural Histories of Sociabilities, Spaces and Mobilities (London: Pickering and Chatto, 2015) - John Lennon

Christopher Kopper and Massimo Moraglio, eds., Th e Organization of Transport: A History of Users, Industry, and Public Policy (New York: Routledge, 2014) - Zhenhua Chen

Paul Ingrassia, Engines of Change: A History of the American Dream in Fifteen Cars (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2012) - Rudi Volti

Hagar Kotef, Movement and the Ordering of Freedom: On Liberal Governances of Mobility (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2015) - Gopalan Balachandran

Bernd Stiegler, Traveling in Place: A History of Armchair Travel. Trans. Peter Filkins. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010) - Katarina Gephardt

Thomas Buhler, Déplacements urbains: sortir de l’orthodoxie. Plaidoyer pour une prise en compte des habitudes (Lausanne: Presses Polytechniques et Universitaires Romandes, 2015) - Mathieu Flonneau

Ruth A. Miller, Snarl: In Defense of Stalled Traffi c and Faulty Networks (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2015) - Kyle Shelton

Novel Review

Emily St. John Mandel, Station Eleven (London: Picador, 2014) - Fiona Wilkie