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Marie-Ève Thérenty

This article describes the results developed in the recently published La Civilisation du journal, histoire culturelle et littéraire de la presse (ed. Dominique Kalifa, Philippe Régnier, Marie-Ève Thérenty, and Alain Vaillant), a collaboration between historians and literary scholars working together for eight years to write a synthesis about the history of the French press during the nineteenth century. It offers a comprehensive encyclopedia of journalism, the genres and forms of the periodical press, the principal figures of nineteenth-century French journalism, and the modern culture of the press. The article describes the different projects between history and literature that could be developed after this project. This kind of methodology should be extended to the relations between press and literature during the twentieth century, to women's journalism and to the globalization of the media during the nineteenth century. These projects could be developed with the help of the website Médias19.

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Marie-Ève Thérenty

Ces dernières années en France, les recherches sur la presse, qui avaient été longtemps le domaine des historiens du politique puis des historiens des médias, ont notablement bénéficié de l’apport des littéraires. Les spécialistes du dix-huitième siècle, Jean Sgard, Pierre Rétat et Claude Labrosse1 ont enclenché ce mouvement bientôt suivi par les dix-neuviémistes qui ont renouvelé l’histoire de la presse avec la publication par une équipe d’historiens et de littéraires associés de La Civilisation du journal : Histoire culturelle et littéraire de la presse au dix-neuvième siècle en 20112.

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Journalistes scandaleuses des années trente

Petite réflexion sur l’histoire de la presse de l’entre-deux-guerres

Marie-Ève Thérenty

This article deals with women stunt reporters—French journalists Maryse Choisy, Marise Querlin, and Odette Pannetier—who chose to investigate under cover in the 1930s. Using various disguises, they made investigations into brothels, tricked their way into politicians’ home, and performed interviews under fake identities. Undercover reporting compensated for their difficulties in asserting themselves in a press created by and for men. It gave them a way to compete with male colleagues who were famous for sensational reportage all over the world. By focusing on such episodes, this article brings to light three heretofore unexplored facets of the history of the French press: immersion investigation, the history of women journalists, and the poetics of the 1930s press.