Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 9 of 9 items for

  • Author: Michael Lambek x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Fantasy in Practice

Projection and Introjection, or the Witch and the Spirit-Medium

Michael Lambek

What is the relationship of psychoanalysis to questions of dignity, self-respect and respect for others?1 How, ultimately can we link Freud with Aristotelian concerns for eudaimonia – human flourishing – and for phronesis – sustained moral judgement?2 If Freud rightly tempers Aristotle’s optimism, how might Aristotelian questions illuminate and complement Freudian forays into personhood? If repression is defined as a state of disconnection and disavowal, of nonacknowledgement of one’s own thoughts and acts, then it is morally and politically problematic. Repression generates projection, in which accountability is displaced onto others. However, I argue that in some instances, and given the appropriate cultural means, it may provoke a dialectical return. Such introjection provides the opportunity for gradual reconnection, recognition and, ideally, the acknowledgement of responsibility.

Free access

Irony and Illness

Recognition and Refusal

Michael Lambek

Proponents of irony can hardly propose a definite theory or even a definitive introduction to their subject. Here we intend merely to review the impetus for our volume and the suggestions we gave our bemused contributors.

Restricted access

Rheumatic Irony

Questions of Agency and Self-deception as Refracted through the Art of Living with Spirits

Michael Lambek

The story of a young man from the Western Indian Ocean island of Mayotte who was prevented from a career in the French army by an illness sent by a spirit who possesses his mother inspires reflection on the nature of agency. I suggest that spirit possession and the ill- nesses it produces are intrinsically ironic. The prevalence of irony implies not that we should disregard agency but that perhaps we should not take it too literally.

Restricted access

Comments on Feldman

Michael Lambek

Restricted access

Portrait: Saba Mahmood (In Memoriam)

Amira Mittermaier, Susan Harding, and Michael Lambek

A Portrait in Scenes by Amira Mittermaier

For Saba by Susan Harding

Recollections of a Friendship by Michael Lambek

Open access

Portrait: Michael Lambek

Michael Lambek, Robert W. Hefner, and Cheryl Mattingly

In an article as relevant now as when it was written, asks: “How in a world of divided creeds is one to find out which is the true belief?” She draws from Gotthold Lessing's character Nathan the Wise to say (ibid.: 95):

There are two possible solutions to the problem, that of the fundamentalist and that of the sage. The fundamentalist overcomes the problem of multiplicity by a return to the One. Truth can be restored only if rivals are eliminated and false pretenders unmasked. Truth and order are founded on the tyranny of the One. The solution of the sage is founded on the metaphysics of absence … Under these conditions, multiplicity cannot be overcome. It has to be endured, tolerated. It is a permanent reminder of the fact that absolute truth is not for this world as we know it. To put it in a paradoxical way: it is the discovery of enlightenment that we are all groping in the dark.

Open access

Around David Henig's Remaking Muslim Lives

Everyday Islam in Postwar Bosnia and Herzegovina

Catherine Wanner, Michael Lambek, Basit Kareem Iqbal, Joel Robbins, and David Henig

Around David Henig's Remaking Muslim Lives: Everyday Islam in Postwar Bosnia and Herzegovina Urbana, Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2020, paperback, 210 pages

Free access

Contributors

Paul Antze, Janice Boddy, Lawrence Cohen, Vincent Crapanzano, Andrew Lakoff, Michael Lambek, and Anne Meneley

Notes on Contributors

Free access

Contributors

Rohan Bastin, Marit Brendbekken, René Devisch, Allen Feldman, Ørnulf Gulbrandsen, Bruce Kapferer, Michael Lambek, Knut Rio, and Kari G. Telle

Notes on contributors