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Miriam David

This article is a critique of the expansion of higher education in global and national contexts. First I provide an analysis of the transformation of higher education as a form of 'academic capitalism' and how second-wave feminist critiques and pedagogies have become incorporated as have women, amongst other social groups, in increasingly diverse forms of post-compulsory education. Yet, the transformations in global higher education have not been in the direction of greater gender or social equity. Second, I provide evidence of the policies and practices of the U.K. government in widening participation to U.K. higher education, drawing on research, commissioned by the U.K. government, and conducted by the Teaching and Learning Research Programme. I provide detailed research evidence, from the seven projects, about the policies, practices and pedagogies within English higher education. I argue that, although neither gender nor social equality has been accomplished, there is evidence of practices that value and respect social diversity and inclusion of women's diverse perspectives and feminist pedagogies.

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David G. Farley, Jill Dubisch, Miriam L. Wallace, Eroulla Demetriou, and Igor Tchoukarine

Corinne Fowler, Charles Forsdick, and Ludmilla Kostova, eds., Travel and Ethics: Theory and Practice (2014) Reviewed by David G. Farley

Antón M. Pazos, ed., Pilgrims and Pilgrimages as Peacemakers in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam (2013) Reviewed by Jill Dubisch

Kathryn Walchester, Gamle Norge and Nineteenth-Century British Women Travellers in Norway (2014) Reviewed by Miriam L. Wallace

Jim Bowman, Narratives of Cyprus: Modern Travel Writing and Cultural Encounters since Lawrence Durrell (2015) Reviewed by Eroulla Demetriou

Diane P. Koenker, Club Red: Vacation Travel in the Soviet Dream (2013) Reviewed by Igor Tchoukarine