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Paisley Livingston

Ted Nannicelli, A Philosophy of the Screenplay

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Questions of Authorship

Some Comments on David Bordwell’s Narration in the Fiction Film

Paisley Livingston

Abstract

These comments concern Bordwell’s explicit and implicit claims about cinematic authorship in his 1985 Narration in the Fiction Film. Distinctions are drawn between causal and attributionist conceptions of authorship, and between actualist and fictionalist views about the spectator’s attitude toward authorship. A key question concerns the autonomy or independence of a viewer’s competent uptake of story and narration, as opposed to its dependence on knowledge of authorship or authorial design. The example of cinematic quotation in Resnais’s Mon oncle d’Amérique is used to illustrate the pertinence of the latter option.

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Paisley Livingston

Abstract

These brief comments raise some questions about Murray Smith’s remarks, in his new volume Film, Art, and the Third Culture: A Naturalized Aesthetics of Film, on the nature of aesthetic experience. My questions concern how we might best draw a viable distinction between aesthetic and non-aesthetic experiences and focus in particular on possible links between self-awareness and aesthetic experiences. In sum, I agree with Smith in holding that we should not give up on the notion of aesthetic experience, even though aestheticians continue to disagree regarding even the most basic questions pertaining to its nature.

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Paisley Livingston

This article explores basic constraints on the nature and appreciation of cinematic adaptations. An adaptation, it is argued, is a work that has been intentionally based on a source work and that faithfully and overtly imitates many of this source's characteristic features, while diverging from it in other respects. Comparisons between an adaptation and its source(s) are essential to the appreciation of adaptations as such. In spite of many adaptation theorists' claims to the contrary, some of the comparisons essential to the appreciation of adaptations as such pertain to various kinds of fidelity and to the ways in which similar types of artistic goals and problems are taken up in an adaptation and its source(s).

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Vivian Sobchack, Paisley Livingston and Bennett Roth

Laura Mulvey, DEATH 24 X A SECOND: STILLNESS AND THE MOVING IMAGE. London: Reaktion Books, 2006. xii + 196 pp., $24.95 (paperback).

Steene, Birgitta, INGMAR BERGMAN: A REFERENCE GUIDE. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2005, 1,150 pp., $75 (hardback).

Andrew M. Gordon, EMPIRE OF DREAMS: THE SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY FILMS OF STEVEN SPIELBERG. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2008, x + 291 pp., $26.95 (paperback).

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Paisley Livingston, Douglas Pye, Robert Stecker and George M. Wilson

INTRODUCTION

Paisley Livingston

SEEING FICTIONS IN FILM

Douglas Pye

THE IMAGINED SEEING THESIS

Paisley Livingston

FILM NARRATION, IMAGINATIVE SEEING, AND SEEING-IN

Robert Stecker

REPLY: SEEING THROUGH THE IMAGINATION IN CINEMA

George M. Wilson