Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for

  • Author: Stephen Prince x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Stephen Prince

David Bordwell’s Narration in the Fiction Film is one of the groundbreaking books in film and narrative theory, and it has been thirty years since its original publication. We begin this issue with a symposium marking that book’s importance for the field. Scholars from cognitive science, literature, philosophy, and film studies assess the book’s impact. Its author, David Bordwell, replies to their remarks and shares his contemporary perspective on the book. I thank the participants in this symposium and especially Malcolm Turvey for his efforts to organize it.

Full access

Stephen Prince

In this issue of Projections, Dan Flory examines issues of race in film from a singular angle. He is interested in understanding how disgust reactions, manifested by viewers in relation to characters and situations, are inflected by racial dimensions of meaning and experience. Examining a wide range of films, he approaches the issue from the perspective of analytic philosophy and argues that the ways that viewers embody their sense of race through disgust reactions has implications for cognitive film theory.

Full access

Stephen Prince

Opening this issue of Projections is a provocative article by Ted Nannicelli exploring the myriad ways viewers today may encounter movies and the issues these modes of encounter pose for conceptions of cinema that emphasize a fixed, large-screen format. One of the ironies of cinema history is that, for most of its lifetime, cinema was seen as a big-screen medium, and many of its stylistic features evolved accordingly. Now, though, small screens proliferate, and many viewers find these to be perfectly acceptable ways of viewing films. The medium’s evolution into small, capsulized viewing formats challenges some of our aesthetic and pedagogical assumptions, and Nannicelli explores these in detail.

Full access

Stephen Prince

Six years ago, I became editor of Projections, succeeding Ira Konigsberg, who had conceived of this journal and launched it with Berghahn as publisher. Projections was then and remains now a unique journal, conjoining work on cinema from a diverse range of disciplines addressing the cognitive and emotional areas where movies meet viewers. These six years have gone by very fast, and the current issue will be my last one as editor. I have greatly enjoyed serving the journal and helping to shepherd new works into print. Now, though, it is time to ride on. Berghahn is a wonderful publisher with whom to work, and my coeditors—Todd Berliner, Ted Nannicelli, and Carl Plantinga— helped to make producing the journal a very rewarding experience. Ted will be assuming the post of editor with the next issue, and I know that he will do a fi ne job. I am grateful to all with whom I have worked and to whom I extend a hearty “thank you.”

Restricted access

Stephen Prince

Digital visual effects bridge art and science in ways that have expanded the expressive tools available to filmmakers. Digital imaging also has enlarged a domain for realism in cinema based on indexical and perceptual factors. Examining these factors, the article questions the visual skepticism that often surrounds discussion of visual effects in film studies. A conjunction of art and science has characterized cinema throughout its history, especially in the era of “philosophical toys” from which the medium originated. The article examines that era in light of what it suggests about digital imaging today and the aesthetic forms that it enables.

Full access

Stephen Prince

When Sam Peckinpah turned over his raw footage for Ride the High Country

(1962) to the MGM studio editor, she declared that the material he had filmed

for the final gunfight was incompetent and that it could not be edited together

in a coherent way. Viewed today, the scene does not seem especially

transgressive in its treatment of continuity, but in that earlier period when

studio editing rules were more conservative, Peckinpah’s disregard for standardized

camera set-ups and conventional coverage perplexed and infuriated

MGM’s editor.

Full access

Stephen Prince

As it developed, cinema gained in popularity by offering pleasures that viewers found easy to experience and understand. Faced with an uncommonly vivid and accessible medium, moviegoers responded enthusiastically to comedies and dramas, and filmmakers learned to craft stories and characters and to design images and image transitions that made intuitive sense and that sustained the fictional worlds on screen and the pleasures engendered by an immersive visual experience.

Full access

Stephen Prince

This issue of Projections focuses on movie violence, a topic of continuing controversy. Concerns about screen violence are not new. Because of their visceral power, popular appeal, and the seeming ease with which they bypassed established channels and norms of socialization, movies swiftly drew the attention and scorn of social critics and reformers. The city of Chicago passed the nation’s first movie censorship ordinance in 1907. Numerous state and municipal censor boards were established in its wake, and movie violence drove the first court-adjudicated censorship case in American film history. The James Boys in Missouri (1908) and Night Riders (1908) were Westerns that Chicago authorities deemed to be immoral because they concentrated on showing the exploits of violent outlaws. The Chicago reformers felt that the films lacked an appropriate moral balance in failing to devote sufficient attention to law-abiding characters.

Full access

Stephen Prince

The journal’s subtitle—“movies and mind”—points to the intersection of cinema and its viewers. Although it works in foreseeable ways, mind is not a machine. Its constituents include the unique sets of circumstances that define a person; thus there are many routes to revealing the intersection of movies and mind.

Full access

Stephen Prince

This issue of Projections ranges across the avant-garde cinema, tear-jerking melodramas, the nature of historical trauma, and narratives that assume playful, game-like formats and that may be found in title sequences and trailers.