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Tomás Errázuriz

For countries that are not leaders in modernization and technology, discussions of transportation history frequently conclude by acknowledging insufficient research on this topic. Indeed, this was my first impression when committing to this assignment. Nevertheless, once I started to review and gather material, my findings exceeded my initial expectations.

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Peter Norton, Gijs Mom, Liz Millward, Mathieu Flonneau and Tomás Errázuriz

With volume 4 the T2M Yearbook has graduated from its initial three-year experimental phase. We can now speak of our Yearbook’s history and its traditions—among them relentless pursuit of historiographical reviews about mobility scholarship in countries that too often escape attention elsewhere, unusual thematic reviews that offer new perspectives on historical mobility studies, and more personal, retrospective assessments of the contributions of leading scholars and classic works. The 17 peer-reviewed articles in this year’s Yearbook are faithful to these traditions.

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Dhan Zunino Singh, Tomás Errázuriz, Rodrigo Booth and Melina Piglia

For more than a decade a group of scholars has tried to reconstruct and analyze the history of mobilities in Latin America. Meetings such as the T2M annual conference and rich collaborative projects and publications have fostered a common approach to this work, a method built upon theoretical and methodological approaches as much as a common “sensibility” toward mobilities. Without being fully aware of his position, Guillermo Giucci has been an invaluable member of this group. Although distance and other circumstances have prevented his direct participation in the meetings mentioned above, his work has nonetheless traversed the region, capturing the attention of fellow mobility scholars and becoming an essential reference for most ongoing work. Giucci’s influential position stems from his willingness to study subjects that few of his colleagues have grappled with and to break with the typical isolation and lack of comparative research found in Latin American mobility history.