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Negotiating between Shi’a and Catholic Rituals in Iran

A Case Study of Filipina Converts and Their Adult Children

Ashraf Zahedi

Religious rituals, while comforting for believers, may be uncomfortable for those who do not share their manifold meanings. Catholic Filipinas who marry Muslim Iranian men face mandatory conversion to Islam, necessitating ongoing negotiations between Christianity and Islam. My research suggests that these Filipinas held their first religion dear while participating in – for them – unpleasant Shi’a Muslims rituals. Their Filipino/Iranian children, familiar from birth with Shi’a Islam, felt at home with both religions, no matter which one they chose for themselves. The discussion of converts’ perceptions of Shi’a rituals contributes to the literature on transnational marriages and marriage migration.

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Introduction

Interrogating Aspirations through Migratory Mobilities

Supurna Banerjee and Eva Gerharz

's migration within that of marriage migration). The aspirations to generate an income or look after the family fall within the repertoire of masculinity. 10 Women's migrations, then, are differently framed. Aspirations of economic mobility or greater autonomy

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“Who Leaves Home If There is a Choice?”

Migration Decisions of Women Workers on Tea Plantations in India

Supurna Banerjee

, has often been subsumed under marriage migration, as World Bank and ILO reports suggest. At the same time, scholars like Samita Sen have shown how livelihood, too, features importantly in these migrations. 4 In this article, migration and its related