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Film as the Engine for Learning

A Model to Assess Film’s Interest Raising Potential

Winnifred Wijnker, Ed S. Tan, Arthur Bakker, Tamara A. J. M. van Gog, and Paul H. M. Drijvers

Film has been used for education ever since educators recognized its powerful potential for learning. But its educational application has been criticized throughout the decades for underuse of the distinctive potential of film: to raise interest. To understand more fully film’s potential for learning, we propose a dynamic model of viewer interest and its underlying cognitive and emotional mechanisms (film’s interest raising mechanisms or FIRM model). In addition, we present an analysis method for assessing the interestingness of films in learning contexts. Our model marries interest theories from cognitive film theory and educational psychology and captures the dynamics of interestingness across a film as depending on a balance between challenge posed and coping potential provided.

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Through Our Eyes

Using Photovoice to Address Stigma in the Age of AIDS

Learning Together Project

Learning Together Project

Th e photographs in this essay were taken by grade eight and nine girls in one rural school in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa in response to the question: What is the face of stigma in our community in the context of HIV and Aids? Th e girls used inexpensive point-and-shoot cameras to document the issues on location at their school, staging scenes that tell critical stories of the impact of stigma on the community. Once they had taken the photographs they developed captions which speak to the issues that they were working to represent. Some wrote in isiZulu while others chose to write in English. Th e isiZulu captions were translated into English. The images in this photovoice project help to identify, understand and interpret incidents related to stigma and discrimination against people living with, and aff ected by, HIV and AIDS.

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Adaptive Regulation

A Possible Model for Regulation and Innovation in Personal Social Services

Lihi Lahat and Yekoutiel Sabah

characteristics of these services and responding to the need for innovation in public organizations. We propose a comprehensive regulatory process, based on learning, collaboration, and flexible features, as well as a new rhetorical language. By personal social

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Novices in bureaucratic regimes

Learning to be a claimant in the United Kingdom

Michelle Obeid

negotiate her housing rights in London. Empirically, a sustained engagement with this single case, over time and in different encounters, offers a deep understanding of how a learning curve occurs. This is in a context where longstanding language

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Community and Creativity in the Classroom

An Experiment in the Use of the Guest Interview, Focus Group Interviews and Learning Journals in the Teaching and Learning of the Anthropology of Modern Dance

Jonathan Skinner and Kirk Simpson

This article assesses the experimental teaching and learning of an anthropology module on 'modern dance'. It reviews the teaching and learning of the modern dances (lecture, observation, embodied practice, guest interview), paying attention to the triangulation of investigation methods (learning journal, examination, self-esteem survey, focus group interview). Our findings suggest that—in keeping with contemporary participatory educational approaches—students prefer guest interviews and 'performances of understanding' for teaching and learning, and that focus groups and learning journals were the preferred research methods for illuminating the students' teaching and learning experience.

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Playing with Teaching Techniques

Gamelan as a Learning Tool Amongst Children with Learning Impairments in Northern Ireland

Jonathan McIntosh

This article examines gamelan as a community musical tool in Northern Ireland, United Kingdom. In particular, the article demonstrates how traditional pedagogic practices are changed in order to suit the needs of those who learn gamelan. A gamelan is an orchestra that includes metallophones (large glockenspiel-like instruments), gongs and drums. Originating from Southeast Asia, particularly from the Indonesian islands of Java and Bali, gamelan ensembles have long been used in the teaching of ethnomusicology in academic institutions and for purposes of applied ethnomusicology, as a musical tool, in the wider community. In these contexts, a gamelan instructor acts as a 'mediator' (Naughton 1996: 16) in the transmission of gamelan knowledge; mediating not only between the music and the learners, but also between the role of gamelan in its original sociocultural context and its newly adopted milieu. Drawing upon my experiences as a gamelan instructor, in particular, teaching children with visual and hearing impairments, I demonstrate how traditional teaching techniques are adapted to facilitate the learning of gamelan in the Northern Irish context.

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Learning in Collaborative Moments

Practising Relating Differently with Dementia in Dialogue Meetings

Silke Hoppe, Laura Vermeulen, Annelieke Driessen, Els Roding, Marije de Groot, and Kristine Krause

From Giving Back to Learning Together Giving back to the field is widely seen as good practice in anthropology. Ever since the crisis of representation and the reflexive turn of the 1980s, anthropologists are expected to explicate how they

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‘Those Twins of Learning’

Cognitive and Affective Learning in an Inclusive Shakespearean Curriculum

Sheila T. Cavanagh and Steve Rowland

Rowland and Cavanagh work together effectively, but they continue to contend with disjunctures related to the learning aspects of these courses, since the aims include both intellectually rigorous study of Shakespeare and the kinds of achievements commonly

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Active learning in criminal justice

The benefits of student investigation of wrongful convictions in a higher education setting

Jill Dealey

Advocates of active learning in higher education applaud the use of approaches that encourage student involvement in research and inquiry and state that it is the most effective means of enabling a move away from more traditional (and now less

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Islam, Travel, and Learning

A Case Study on Indonesian Muslim Student Diasporas in Saudi Arabia

Sumanto Al Qurtuby

vitality of Cairo in general, and al-Azhar in particular, as a center for religious learning that attracts Muslim students from all over the world. Anthony Bubalo, Sarah Phillips, and Samina Yasmeen (2011) conducted a preliminary study on Indonesian