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We're Taking Back Sexy

Girl Bloggers SPARK a Movement and Create Enabling Conditions for Healthy Sexuality

Lyn Mikel Brown

SPARK, Sexualization Protest Action Resistance Knowledge, is an intergenerational movement that raises awareness about, and pushes back against, the sexualization of women and girls in the media to create room for whole girls. In this article, I document the ways in which the SPARKTeam, a diverse collection of young feminist bloggers, contributes to the creation of conditions that enable healthy sexuality by using their blogs to reclaim what it means to be sexy, and to invite creative forms of resistance to media sexualization.

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Sunny Stalter-Pace and Gijs Mom

How do you represent a moment when crossing a bridge became a major historical fl ash point? Th e twenty-fi fth of March of this year marked the fiftieth anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s fifty-four-mile march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital of Montgomery, a march to protest the lack of voting rights for African Americans in the southern United States. Th e major point of contention, where infrastructure and politics met, was the Edmund Pettus Bridge leading out of Selma. Th e first attempt to march occurred on what was later known as Bloody Sunday. Black protestors attempted to cross the bridge, against the instruction of local and state troopers. Th ey were beaten mercilessly and the footage was broadcast on national television. Th e second attempt took place after Dr. King put out a call to all Americans who identify with the civil rights movement. Th ey gathered on the bridge and knelt to pray. King sensed trouble and called off the march. After a court decision in favor of the protestors, the march took place.

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Ruy Llera Blanes

In this article, through a set of ethnographic vignettes from fieldwork conducted in Angola since 2015, I discuss the political semantics of crisis and austerity, and simultaneously outline an itinerary of a “traveling austerity” between Portugal and Angola, exposing the interconnectedness and mutual binding of both political and economic contexts. Invoking stories of migrant workers in Luanda and the work of local “financial activists” protesting against financial inequality in Angola, I question the relevance of national-based approaches to austerity politics, explore conceptualizations of austerity beyond its “original,” mainstream Eurocentric setting, and argue towards the necessity of analyzing transnational intersections in the study of austerity.

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The Adventures of William Hood

Fictions of Shakespeare the Deer Stealer

Paul Franssen

In fiction as in biography, Shakespeare's life is often politicised. Originally, the story of young Shakespeare caught poaching deer and forced to flee Stratford served to illustrate the role of fate in the creation of genius, while his irresponsible behaviour was downplayed. Later, the poaching was represented as rebellion against aristocratic privileges, and even as a deliberate political protest against enclosures of arable land. In more recent fiction, Shakespeare needs to be forced into a social awareness by the deer stealing episode, or even becomes a heartless landlord himself. Thus, Shakespeare's fictional lives reflect political developments in society, from class conflict to cultural levelling.

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The Left Party and the AfD

Populist Competitors in Eastern Germany

Jonathan Olsen

In the 2017 German Federal Election. The Left Party (Die Linke, or LP) saw its vote share in eastern Germany seriously erode. The main culprit behind the LP’s losses was the Alternative for Germany (AfD): 430,000 voters who cast their ballots for the LP in 2013 voted for the AfD in 2017. Why was this the case? This article suggests that the AfD in 2017 was able to attract protest voters, largely in eastern Germany, dissatisfied with the state of democracy and the political establishment in Germany who once voted for the LP. The LP and AfD have become eastern German populist competitors.

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Sara Lennox

Gender Relations in German History: Power, Agency and Experience from the Sixteenth to the Twentieth Century edited by Lynn Abrams and Elizabeth Harvey

Frank Biess

Divided Memory. The Nazi Past in the Two Germanies by Jeffrey Herf

Erik Willenz

Embattled Selves: An Investigation into the Nature of Identity through Oral Histories of Holocaust Survivors by Kenneth Jacobson

Wade Jacoby

The Grand Experiment: Debating Shock Therapy, Transition Theory, and the East German Experience by Andreas Pickel and Helmut Wiesenthal

Henry Krisch

Creating German Communism, 1890-1990: From Popular Protests to Socialist State by Eric D. Weitz

Jan Plamper

Stalinism and Nazism: Dictatorships in Comparison edited by Ian Kershaw and Moshe Lewin

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M. Anne Sa'adah

Joschka Fischer (b. 1948), Germany’s foreign minister and for several

years one of the country’s most popular politicians, is a man of

the moment, of consequence both domestically and beyond his

country’s borders. Nationally prominent as leader of the “realo” faction

of the Greens, he was instrumental in turning a protest movement

into the partner in power of the Social Democratic Party

(SPD). During the Kosovo crisis, he was a key figure in securing

German participation in the NATO intervention. He has played an

influential role in the unfolding debate about institutional reform

within the European Union. During the latest round of Israeli-Palestinian

violence, he has actively tried to bring the parties to the table.

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The Cartoon Controversy

Creating Muslims in a Danish Setting

Anja Kublitz

This article offers a situational analysis of the printing of cartoons about the Islamic Prophet in a Danish newspaper in 2005 and the ensuing demonstration by Danish Muslims. It suggests that rather than simply sparking protests, the 'cartoon controversy' created a space for possible actions and a political platform for Muslims all over the world. Based on a review of the historical development of the national Danish discourse on immigrants, the article conveys how the cartoon controversy became instrumental in transforming this discourse. As a major creative event, it not only ridiculed a dominant religious symbol but simultaneously created a space for the becoming of Muslims in Denmark and beyond.

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David Hawkes

The twenty-first century has witnessed the rise to power of images in every aspect of human endeavour. Speculative financial derivatives have achieved a predominant place in the economy, spin and perception rule the political sphere, and technological media ensure that we spend our lives surrounded by images of all kinds. Reading the works of Shakespeare reveals the roots of this process in the early modern period, when the iconoclasm of the Reformation, popular protests against usury, and the campaign against ritual magic combined to provide an ethically based popular resistance to the power of signs.

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Edward A. Tiryakian

On 2 April 2009 a well-publicized Summit meeting of the Group of Twenty Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors, more commonly known as the G-20, was held at London’s ExCel Centre in Custom House to discuss the great crisis facing the world’s weakened financial system and to propose, among other things, regulation to prevent systemic risks.1 The meeting was well attended by finance ministers, central bankers and hordes of reporters who gleefully reported as much on the protestors of disparate groups as on the accomplishments of the meeting.