Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 37 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

Kaloyan Haralampiev and Georgi Dimitrov

[Full article is in English]

English: This article proposes a novel two-level instrument for analytically robust distinction of typological differences in the area of rule of law (ROL) among the European countries. The first level of analysis uses the EC’s first anti-corruption report data for a cumulative calculation of the country’s rank of anti-corruption potential. This procedure is repeated on a higher level of aggregation, wherein the EC’s anti-corruption ranking is combined with the rankings of the World Press Freedom and Rule of Law Indices. Thus, the authors create a database for the second level quantitative instrument, which is a variation of cluster analysis. The stable clusters obtained do not coincide with conventional blocks of countries that figure in the academic literature.. The instrument for the measurement of the ROL ranking could be even more important for the assessment of the advancement of the candidate-states toward their full compliance with the EU ROL standards.

Spanish: Este artículo propone un instrumento doble nivel para un análisis detallado de las diferencias tipológicas del estado de derecho entre países europeos. El primer nivel utiliza el primer informe anti-corrupción de la CE para calcular de manera cumulativa la clasifi cación del potencial anti-corrupción de cada país. Este procedimiento se repite en un nivel superior de acumulación donde la clasifi cación anti-corrupción de la CE se combina con los índices mundiales de la libertad de prensa y el estado de derecho. Así, los autores crean una base de datos para el segundo nivel cuantitativo en una variación para el análisis de conglomerados. Como resultado, los conglomerados estables obtenidos no coinciden con los bloques convencionales de países que figuran en la literatura académica –antiguos/nuevos estados miembros de la UE; democracias consolidadas/ sociedades post-comunistas; Este/Oeste, etc. El instrumento para medir la clasifi cación del estado de derecho podría incluso ser más importante para evaluar el progreso de los países candidatos respecto al cumplimiento total de los estándares del estado de derecho de la UE.

French: Cet article propose un instrument nouveau à double niveau pour établir une distinction analytiquement solide des diff érences typologiques en matière d’État de droit dans les pays européens. Le premier niveau d’analyse utilise les données du premier rapport anti-corruption de la CE pour calculer de manière cumulative le classement du potentiel anti-corruption de chaque pays. Cett e procédure est répétée à un niveau plus élevé d’accumulation dans lequel le classement anti-corruption de la CE est combiné avec ceux des indices du classement mondial de la liberté de la presse et de l’Etat de droit. Ainsi, les auteurs créent une base de données destinée à l’instrument quantitatif de second niveau qui est une variante de l’analyse de clusters. Les clusters stables obtenus ne coïncident pas avec les blocs conventionnels de pays qui figurent dans la litt érature académique -anciens et nouveaux États membres de l’UE; démocraties consolidées/sociétés post-communistes; Est/Ouest, etc. Cet instrument de mesure du classement de l’État de droit pourrait être bien plus important pour l’évaluation des avancées des États candidats vers leur totale conformité avec les standards de l´Etat de droit de l’UE.

Restricted access

Land, Nation and Tourist

Moral Reckoning in Post-GFC Iceland

Mary Hawkins and Helena Onnudottir

Land is central to Icelandic identity. It is birthright, heritage, a site of memory and belonging; mountains and fjords are the stuff on which Icelandic dreams are made. Land is made culture through story and song, told at family gatherings, and sung at schools and on hiking trips. Icelandic identity was built on this imagining, coupled to a vision of Icelanders as an exceptional people, a Viking race. The events of the Global Financial Crisis (GFC), which exposed institutional corruption, caused many Icelanders to doubt the Viking image. At the same time, Iceland has been invaded by tourists. This article, based on participant observation, a survey and interviews, argues that one significant effect of the post-GFC foreign invasion has been a transformation of the cultural and moral order in Iceland, away from the boasting Viking and towards a new set of values within which land and nature occupy an even more central place.

Restricted access

The Corrupt State of Exception

Agamben in the Light of Putin

Jakob Rigi

This article revisits Agamben's concept of 'state of exception'. It argues that the postmodern state of exception is exercised not through the suspension of law, as Agamben suggests and as was the case with modern sovereignty, but through the counterfeiting of legality. The counterfeiting of law, which corrupts its meaning, is part of the broader 'corruption of sign' in the postmodern political-cultural economy. The article first details an extended case of counterfeiting of legality in the practices of business raiding, commonly termed reiderstvo, in Russia. It then describes and analyzes the main features of what I call the 'corrupt state of exception' in Russia. The article concludes with a few remarks on the paradigmatic nature of the state of exception in Russia and its consequences for legal and political anthropology.

Restricted access

The Rule of Law as a Condition for Development toward Sustainability

Toward a New Legally Oriented Environment at a Global Level

Giovanni Tartaglia Polcini

This article, conceived on an open-process approach, explains the Italian rule of law’s model promoted by Italy in multilateral and bilateral fora. The rule of law aims to counter the abuse of power by the authorities and to build a new legally oriented environment in a multilevel order. (The rule by law, however, may be used to oppress or discriminate against people and to avoid accountability under the guise of formality, legality, and legitimacy.) Furthermore, the rule of law is instrumentally valuable to economic sustainable growth in delivering concrete development. The Italian achievements are demonstrated by the experiences acquired in G20 anti-corruption initiatives that vouch for Italy’s legitimacy and credibility on priority areas related to the struggle against global crime, drugs, money laundering, and terrorism. Moreover, Italian juridical diplomacy for promoting the rule of law at the multilateral level is framed according to the guidelines of sustainable development and the protection of human rights.

Restricted access

Bruce Lincoln

The point of departure for this article is a description of punitive practices reported to have been employed in Achaemenian Persia around 400 BCE. On closer examination, what appears to be an example of sadistic torture proves to be a judiciary ordeal constructed in such a way as to convert the accused's body (and bodily processes) into conclusive evidence of his guilt and, simultaneously, to confirm imperial ideology. This episode provides the basis for reconsidering events at Abu Ghraib prison, where, it is argued, low-level American GIs obsessively enacted a finite set of scenarios in a desperate attempt to make their captives' bodies confirm arguments used to justify the war in Iraq as a struggle against low, dark, craven, perverse, and corrupt beings dismissable as 'terrorists'.

Restricted access

The Decline of Rome

The Never-Ending Crisis in the Capital

Giada Zampano

The first female mayor in Rome’s history, Virginia Raggi, is faced with a dual challenge. First, she must try to solve the chronic problems of a city mired in debt and struggling with an ongoing emergency caused by chronic traffic problems and chaotic waste disposal. Then the young mayor must experiment with new ways of exercising power to establish the transparency required to restore the reputation of a political class that has led Rome to become known as the “Mafia Capital,” with its own “in-between world” made up of corrupt politicians, business people, and criminals. Since assuming office, Raggi has faced a political impasse, and her administration has suffered an embarrassing string of resignations and judicial scandals that have brought into question the city’s future prospects. Rome is now at a crossroads that may lead to either a much-awaited renaissance or a definitive meltdown.

Restricted access

A John Barleycorn temptation

Behaviour of Siberian regions on the alcoholic beverages market (1999-2003)

Grigorii L. Olekh

This article considers the recent declining fortunes of the Siberian liquor producing and retail industry. Cheaper vodka 'imported' from regions outside Siberia has led to a loss of revenue from local excise duties. Some firms have gone bankrupt, and others are in serious financial difficulties as a result of unpaid debts to the Inland Revenue. There is also evidence of malpractice and corruption. There are signs, however, that the current difficulties are causing Siberian alcoholic drinks producers to join together and unite in adopting measures to combat the cheaper vodka imports.

Restricted access

Clay Clemens

It was the biggest political scandal in postwar German history. As revelation followed revelation in late 1999, the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) party finance (Parteifinanz) affair tarnished careers, most notably those of former chancellor Helmut Kohl and, separately, his longtime heir apparent Wolfgang Schäuble. When both fell, their party gained a new cadre of leaders. Most analysts expected the fallout ultimately to spread much further, fatally crippling the CDU and perhaps destroying it altogether. Voices could be heard to the effect that this scandal was on the same scale as one that rocked Italy a decade earlier, when the "Clean Hands" investigation unearthed massive evidence of bribery and corruption.

Restricted access

Anthropology of Europe Redux

Déjà vu in the South

Jon P. Mitchell

For good reasons, anthropology some decades ago deconstructed the Mediterraneanist picture of familialist societies in the South. However, this deconstruction unexpectedly had its political twin in Malta’s fight against corruption to meet the conditions for EU-membership in 2004. Drawing on a deeper concept of “territoriality”, introduced by anthropologist Ina-Maria Greverus, the article considers lately observed new variants of nationalist positions that paradoxically are deeply entwined with clientelistic dynamics against the state, culminating in the recent murder of critical journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia.

Restricted access

Per Lundin

This essay maintains that thinking with history is an indispensable component of all informed, judicious policymaking, and that this is something historians are particularly good at. It stresses that engaging in social and political life does not necessarily imply the corruption of the norms of what is deemed good scholarship. It suggests that to take on the role of an expert in policy-making processes may be an attractive option for the socially committed historian. In doing so, historians will need to reflect upon what form their particular expertise should take, how it can be used, and how it can be communicated.