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Wartime Flânerie

The Zucca Controversy

Mary Louise Roberts

This essay reviews an exhibition of André Zucca's photographs titled "Les Parisiens sous l'Occupation," which caused an uproar when it opened in March 2008 at the Musée de la Bibliothèque historique de la ville de Paris. Not surprisingly, the controversy centered on the collaborationist past of Zucca, a photographer for the Nazi wartime periodical Signal. Because Zucca chose to photograph the sunnier side of life in wartime Paris, the exhibition raised the question of just how much Parisians "suffered" during the Occupation. It also demonstrated the powerful role of photography in shaping national memory.

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Self and the City

The Politics of Monuments

Karen Kipphoff

This text looks at the function of monuments and to some extent architecture in the public space. It focuses especially on those countries that have undergone sweeping historical changes, such as Romania, Germany, and Russia, while attempting to convey not only the historical and cultural information but the very personal, physical sensations of the encounter a human being might have when in the proximity of monuments and spaces. The images are 360 degree surround photography, where the photographer's location constituted the very center of the image, thus making the photographer's subjectivity the invisible monument of the seemingly documentary image.

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Editorial

Comics in Dialogue with Other Arts

The Editors

Throughout the history of comics, there has been dialogue between comics and other arts: architecture and literature, caricature and cartoons, painting and music, film and photography, and so on. Some of these, such as architecture, caricature and painting, were present from the very beginnings of comics as a modern art form, in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. For example, the importance of architecture was already apparent in the Northern Looking Glass in a page from 23 January 1826 featuring a cross-section of a building as the framework for a cartoon plate resembling a comics page, though without the sequentiality of the latter.

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Wendy Luttrell

This paper is based on longitudinal, ethnographic research with young people from ages 10-18 growing up in urban, low-income, immigrant communities of color and how they represented their everyday lives and family-school relationships through photography and video. The author analyzes the similarities and differences between the boys’ and girls’ perceptions, participation in, and representations of their care worlds and how this shapes their identities. The article features the themes of love, care and solidarity that were central to the boys’ understandings and identities, re-casting widely held assumptions about the crisis of Black boyhood that preoccupy current educational discourse.

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World Family Portrait

A celebration of humanity's place in the world

RISC Consortium

In 2014, the Regional Integration and Social Cohesion (RISC) Consortium launched an ongoing interactive initiative entitled A World Family Portrait. This call for contributions invites scholars, practitioners, journalists, photographers, and so forth, to submit written and photographic contributions in English, French or Spanish that provoke a contemporary reflection on the human condition through the presentation and analysis of life challenges and opportunities. The goal of these publications is not simply to document world events/social conditions but also to engage readers through photography and prose in a dialogue focusing on the evolution of our world and humanity’s place in it.

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World Family Portrait

A celebration of humanity’s place in the world

RISC Consortium

In 2014, the RISC Consortium launched an ongoing interactive initiative entitled “A World Family Portrait.” This call for contributions invites scholars, practitioners, journalists, photographers, etc. to submit written and photographic contributions in English, French, or Spanish that provoke a contemporary reflection on the human condition through the presentation and analysis of life challenges and opportunities. The goal of these publications is not simply to document world events or social conditions but to engage readers through photography and prose in a dialogue focusing on the evolution of our world and humanity’s place in it. Selected photos will be published periodically in the Leadership Forum section of Regions and Cohesion.

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Making Visible

Objects, Images, and Archives in Visual Anthropology

Diane Losche

Fred Myers, Painting Culture: The Making of an Aboriginal High Art (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2002), 410 pp. ISBN 0-8223-2949-2.

Christopher Pinney and Nicholas Peterson, eds., Photography’s Other Histories (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2003), 286 pp. ISBN 08-2233-1136.

Elizabeth Edwards, Raw Histories: Photographs, Anthropology and Museums (Oxford and New York: Berg, 2001), 270 pp. ISBN 1-85973-497-9.

Chris Gosden and Chantal Knowles, Collecting Colonialism: Material Culture and Colonial Change (Oxford and New York: Berg, 2001), 234 pp. ISBN 185973-408-1.

Reimar Schefield and Han F. Vermuelen, eds., Treasure Hunting? Collectors and Collections of Indonesian Artefacts (Research School of Asian, African and Amerindian Studies [CNWS], Leiden: University of Leiden in association with the National Museum of Ethnology, Leiden, 2002), 324 pp. ISBN 90-5789-078-x.

H. Glenn Penny, Objects of Culture: Ethnology and Ethnographic Museums in Imperial Germany (Chapel Hill and London: University of North Carolina Press, 2002), 281 pp. ISBN 0-8078-5430-1.

Mary Bouquet, ed., Academic Anthropology and the Museum: Back to the Future (New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2001), 239 pp. ISBN 1-57181-321-7.

Christopher Pinney and Nicholas Thomas, eds., Beyond Aesthetics: Art and the Technologies of Enchantment (Oxford and New York: Berg, 2001), 288 pp. ISBN 1-85973-464-2.

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Drawing the Written Woman

Philippe Druillet's Adaptation of Gustave Flaubert's Salammbô

Sonia Lagerwall

This article deals with Philippe Druillet's three-volume comic adaptation (1980–1985) of Salammbô, Gustave Flaubert's historical novel from 1862, set three centuries BC. Flaubert was famous for not wanting his texts illustrated: he argued that the preciseness of images would undo the poetic vagueness of his written words. The article examines how Druillet tackles the challenge of graphically representing Flaubert's canonical work without reducing the priestess Salammbô into a given type. The analysis shows a dynamic adaptation process in which Druillet gives a kaleidoscopic form to Flaubert's text. His variation on the Salammbô character foregrounds photography, a medium historically relevant to the novel but also to Druillet's own artistic training. Featuring his character Lone Sloane in the role of Mathô, the adaptation proves to be a highly personal appropriation of the novel, where Druillet enhances an autobiographical dimension of his work previously hinted at in La Nuit and Gaïl.

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The ethnographic negative

Capturing the impress of boredom and inactivity

Bruce O'Neill

Outside the main railway station in Bucharest, Romania, otherwise unemployed day laborers hustle for small change as informal parking lot attendants (parcagii). While their efforts yield numerous ethnographic observations of entrepreneurial activity, these attendants report “doing nothing” day in and day out. This article explores the tension between etic observations and emic feelings in order to ask a methodological question: how can “not doing” and “absent activity” be captured within an ethnographic method primed to observe activity constantly? In response, this article takes inspiration from photography to develop “the negative” as a technique for bringing the impress of absent activity on social worlds into ethnographic view. The intent of this methodological intervention is to open new theoretical lines of flight into the politics of inactivity.

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Annamari Vänskä

Debates about little girls' loss of innocence, and the sexualization of girls have become an integral part of media in contemporary culture. Fashion advertising representing young girls and certain types of clothes are specifically prone to generate debates about sexualization. This article looks at the sexualization argument through two sets of fashion editorials, one in a December–January 2011 issue of French Vogue, and another in the December–January 1978 issue of the same magazine. The article exposes the problem of sexualization discourse that relates images to lived experiences of girls even though fashion advertising rarely, if ever, is interested in depicting reality. Sexualization is revealed to be a value statement—the Other of innocence which is set up as the norm. Furthermore, fashion photography is shown to be intertextual; images refer to other fashion photographs. In looking at these issues this article opens up space for discussing the visual and sartorial history of the sexual girl.