Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 29 of 29 items for :

Clear All
Free access

This issue of the Israel Studies Review is going to press after the new government in Jerusalem has settled in and is trying to practice what was referred to in the election campaign as “the new politics,” a concept that already calls for some serious analysis. However, one of the facts of life for those of us whose careers are subject to a stately academic rhythm is that we are always behind on the latest events, yet still too close to them to be able to provide a deeper perspective. This is by way of pointing out that our articles were all written in 2012, before the latest major political changes took place in Israel, including the latest election. However, we believe that their lasting value will transcend the immediate headlines.

Restricted access

How Things Hold

A Diagram of Coordination in a Satoyama Forest

Elaine Gan and Anna Tsing

This article experiments with combining three concepts— coordination, assemblage, diagram—to make vivid the composition of a satoyama forest in central Japan. The forest comes to life as a more-than-human assemblage that emerges through coordinations established by evolutionary and historical accommodations to life cycles, seasonal rhythms, and activity patterns. These coordinations are expressed through a diagram of intersecting temporalities of people, plants, and woodlands that condition the flourishing or decline of wild matsutake mushrooms. Working diagrammatically, we can better articulate how juxtapositions of humans and non-humans become assemblages that hold together through coordinations—without a unified purpose or design. We argue that understanding coordination is key to more livable multispecies worlds.

Restricted access

The tempo of wageless work

E. P. Thompson's time-sense at the edges of Rio de Janeiro

Kathleen M. Millar

This article puts E. P. Thompson's writings on time-sense in conversation with the temporality of work on a garbage dump in the outskirts of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. At this site, several thousand urban poor (catadores) collect recyclables for a living outside relations of wage labor. The lived experience of “woven time” on the dump, which combines labor with other activities of the everyday, has fashioned what these workers call “a different rhythm of life.” Diverging from other temporalities of neoliberal capitalism, such as “ruptured time,” woven time emerges as an important dimension of a life well lived, as conceived by catadores. Attention to the micro-temporalities of wageless work reveals how precarious forms of labor in contemporary capitalism constitute processes of subject making that both parallel and diverge from the transition to wage labor that Thompson describes in his social history of capitalism.

Free access

Carol Banks

When I was a child I remember being fascinated by a bundle of very old letters which my grandmother kept at the back of her writing desk, tied together with a piece of faded ribbon. The letters were still in their respective envelopes; some had stamps bearing Queen Victoria’s head – Penny Blacks and Reds – which I marvelled at, for these were collectors’ items already in the 1950s, or so my older sister informed me. The envelopes were addressed in different styles of copperplate handwriting in blue or black ink which had sometimes spitted a careless blot or two randomly across the neatly etched script. Inside, curling characters scrolled across the folded pages, which occasionally enclosed a small memento: a sepia photograph or a pressed flower – a violet still faintly blue. The writing itself seemed to speak volumes to a small child who was still painstakingly learning to form her own characters at school; but the letters were far more than mere handwriting to be deciphered and interpreted. For me, as for my grandmother, these were distinct voices from the past. And in their different rhythms of speech, forms of expression and often oldfashioned vocabulary, these individual letter-writers seemed to momentarily live again when their words were reiterated.

Free access

Jost Dülffer

Researching and writing contemporary history move forward in a

certain rhythm. Today, the 1960s are the decade of major interest,

whereas the 1970s increasingly are becoming the testing ground of

new approaches and reinterpretations. By contrast, the 1950s seem

of little interest—with most of the issues solved and most sources

accessible. But this could be a false impression, especially if one

takes into account the dominant views on this period that have

become popular in the last years. After 1989/90, with the fall of the

Berlin Wall, the unification of Germany, and the end of the Cold

War, many historians developed and corroborated an interpretation

of the postwar decades—a now widely accepted master narrative of

the “German question.” With the benefit of hindsight, they claimed

that Konrad Adenauer’s policy of Western integration was a necessary

and inevitable course, which facilitated eventual reunification.

Other political options would have rendered the Federal Republic of

Germany (FRG) dangerously open to stronger communist pressure or

even would have presented the Soviet Union with the opportunity to

expand its empire to Germany as a whole.

Restricted access

Yiddish Tango

A Musical Genre?

Lloica Czackis

The tango was born just before the turn of the twentieth century in Buenos Aires as the resulting blend of the cultures of Italian, Spanish, French and Eastern European Jewish immigrants and Afro-Argentine rhythms. In the 1910s the tango took Western Europe by storm, soon reaching Eastern Europe. Ballrooms and cabarets featured this Latin American import; composers, Jews amongst them, started to write new tangos. Inevitably, during the Holocaust tango became part of the life of ghettos and concentration camps, where it, now in Yiddish, was once again adopted as a vehicle to express the experience of inmates and their hopes for freedom. Not only did the Nazis allow this music, they forced Lagerkapellen, the camp orchestras, to play the Tango of Death to accompany prisoners as they were marched to the gas chambers. In different and happier circumstances, Jewish musicians living in Buenos Aires and New York – many of whom were émigrés – wrote Yiddish tangos for the Yiddish theatre, musicals and Jewish revues. The mixed nature of tango probably explains why it has been continuously embraced and transformed during its extraordinary voyage around the world. Yiddish tangos are only an episode in this chronicle, an example of the Jews' tendency to adapt to the ethos of their adoptive countries and also, more generally, the mutual acceptance and fruitful interaction between peoples.

Restricted access

Markéta Slavková, Enikő Farkas, Daria Voyloshnikova, Máiréad Nic Craith, Aurélie Godet and Suzana Jovicic

Books

Azra Hromadžić (2015), Citizens of an Empty Nation: Youth and State- Making in Postwar Bosnia-Herzegovina (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press), 248 pp., $59.95, ISBN 9780812247008.

Alexandra Schwell, Nina Szogs, Małgorzata Kowalska, Michał Buchowski (eds.) (2016), New Ethnographies of Football in Europe: People, Passions, Politics (London: Palgrave Macmillan), 241pp., €72.99, ISBN: 978-1-137-51696-1.

Thomas Sikor, Stefan Dorondel, Johannes Stahl, and Phuc Xuan To (2017), When Things Become Property: Land Reform, Authority and Value in Postsocialist Europe and Asia: Max Planck Studies in Anthropology and Economy (Oxford: Berghahn), 250 pp., $120.00/£85.00, ISBN 978-1- 78533-451-1.

Helena Wulff (2017), Rhythms of Writing: An Anthropology of Irish Literature (London: Bloomsbury), 156 pp., £76.50, ISBN 978-1-4742-4413-8.

Films

Anja Unger, director (2016), Carnaval à Villingen: la cinquième saison, produced by ARTE, Le Film à la patte and L’Envol, 52 minutes.

Barbed Wire Fence and Viennese Coffee Houses: A Review of the 2017 Edition of Ethnocineca International Documentary Film Festival Vienna

Restricted access

Jens Kreinath and Refika Sariönder

the centerpieces of the cem . It consists of ritual movements performed by men and women who revolve around their bodily axis with the intent of achieving mystical unity with Allah. The semah is usually divided into three parts based on the rhythm

Restricted access

Jack Hunter, Annelin Eriksen, Jon Mitchell, Mattijs van de Port, Magnus Course, Nicolás Panotto, Ruth Barcan, David M. R. Orr, Girish Daswani, Piergiorgio Di Giminiani, Pirjo Kristiina Virtanen, Sofía Ugarte, Ryan J. Cook, Bettina E. Schmidt and Mylene Mizrahi

portrayed as a place of despair and economic upheaval. She describes how Zambia’s economy has waxed and waned over the years and how this temporal rhythm has allowed Zambians, especially the emerging middle class, to have hope for the future. Such optimism