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Conflicting Interpretations of Gender

Hysteria, Masculinity, and Marriage in Florence Marryat's Nelly Brooke

Greta Depledge

In 1868 Florence Marryat published Nelly Brooke: A Homely Tale, ostensibly a novel full of classic sensation themes: illegitimacy, love, seduction, addiction, and a murder of sorts. More interestingly, however, the novel also plays with nineteenth-century gender expectations and ideas current in medical and scientific discourse. This essay explores the representations of male hysteria and the demonised man of science which this novel depicts. These themes, contained within a hugely satisfying sensation plot, are also offset against the plight of the fortuneless woman in the nineteenth-century marriage market.

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Gustavo Lins Ribiero and Arturo Escobar, eds., World Anthropologies: Disciplinary Transformations within Systems of Power David G. Anderson

Juhani Nourluoto, ed., The Slavicization of the Russian North Lenore A. Grenoble

Andrew A. Gentes, Exile, Murder and Madness in Siberia, 1823-61 Anna Bara

Harvard Ayers, Dave Harman, and Landon Pennington, Arctic Gardens: Voices from an Abundant Land Jennifer Fagen

Kuklick, Henrika, ed., A New History of Anthropology David G. Anderson

Laurence C. Smith, The World in 2050: Four Forces Shaping Civilization's Northern Future Alex Blake

Andrzej Weber and Hugh McKenzie, eds., Prehistoric Foragers of the Cis-Baikal, Siberia. Proceedings of the First Conference of the Baikal Archaeology Project Dennis H. O'Rourke

Books Received for Review

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Surviving Hrant Dink

Carnal Mourning under the Specter of Senselessness

Alice von Bieberstein

This article charts political and affective responses to and transformations engendered by what has been widely considered a defining moment in the recent history of Turkey, namely, the murder of the Armenian editor and journalist Hrant Dink on 19 January 2007. In this analysis, the question of time and temporality is approached from a threefold perspective: the availability of and engagement with temporal discourses that provide schemes for relating time, loss, and value; mourning as a form of laboring on and in time; and activism as a sphere of practice where responses to loss can be reworked with a view to possibly reformulating hopes and promises.

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Pierre Goldman

From Souvenirs obscurs to Lieu de mémoire

Donald Reid

Pierre Goldman was born to Jewish resisters in France in June 1944 and lived with the inability to match his parents' achievements during the war. Although a secondary figure in soixante-huitard movements, his trials for murder in the early 1970s made him a central figure in post-soixante-huitard activists' reflections on their situation. This essay examines Goldman's sui generis efforts to establish his identity as a resister and a Jew, his central role in his generation's attempts to define their relationship to the society they wished to change, and his place in the succeeding generation's efforts to differentiate themselves from the generation of their parents, Goldman's generation.

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Anthropology of Europe Redux

Déjà vu in the South

Jon P. Mitchell

For good reasons, anthropology some decades ago deconstructed the Mediterraneanist picture of familialist societies in the South. However, this deconstruction unexpectedly had its political twin in Malta’s fight against corruption to meet the conditions for EU-membership in 2004. Drawing on a deeper concept of “territoriality”, introduced by anthropologist Ina-Maria Greverus, the article considers lately observed new variants of nationalist positions that paradoxically are deeply entwined with clientelistic dynamics against the state, culminating in the recent murder of critical journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia.

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James E. Young

The question as to why a national monument to the “Murdered Jews

of Europe” should be erected in Berlin is multi-dimensional, and has

answers in political, cultural, and historical contexts. As most people

already know, I once took a hard stand against actually ever completing

a central memorial in Germany to the Holocaust. “Better a

thousand years of Holocaust memorial competitions in Germany

than any final solution to Germany’s Holocaust memorial problem,”

I wrote many years ago. “Instead of a fixed icon for Holocaust memory

in Germany, the debate itself—perpetually unresolved amid everchanging

conditions—might now be enshrined.”

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Emanuel Stelzer

Love suicide was a situation lavishly employed by playwrights in early modern England. We generally regard as tragic heroes the dramatic starcrossed lovers who kill themselves onstage and we see their death as the sensationally pathetic climax of the play. On the other hand, in Elizabethan and early Stuart society, suicide, or, as it was called, ‘self-slaughter’ or ‘self-murder’, was considered both as a crime and as one of the most dreadful sins a Christian could possibly commit. I would suggest that the tension between these two conflicting views on suicide had a relevant emotional impact on the audiences to whom these plays were originally addressed. In order to prove this, I wish to analyse in particular domestic plays which stage the range of responses elicited within a community that has to cope with the suicide of one of its members.

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Claudia Mitchell and Jacqueline Reid-Walsh

We take the title of our editorial introduction to this themed issue of Girlhood Studies from Sandrina de Finney’s lead article in which she explores “alternative conceptualizations of trauma, place, and girlhood that might enact a more critical, politicized girlhood studies.” Contributions to this issue offer what the guest editors refer to as a re-description of girls in crisis. In so doing not only do they offer challenges to definitions of crisis, they also deepen our understanding of what transformative practices might look like. From a consideration of Indigenous girlhood in Canada to a study of country girls in Australia, from work on YouTube to Holloback! and other social media platforms to girls’ digital representations of their own safety, and from changes in newspaper discourse about murdered girls to a consideration of work done with incarcerated girls, we are invited to re-think this notion of girls-in-crisis, and its significance.

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Posthumous Rescue

The Shafia Young Women as Worthy Victims

Yasmin Jiwani

This article focuses on the coverage of the murders of the young Shafia women. Based on an analysis of the coverage published in The Globe and Mail (July 2009 to March 2012), I argue that the young women were constructed as exceptional and worthy victims of a particularly heinous crime—honor killing—allegedly imported from Afghanistan by the Shafia patriarch. I interrogate the different threads that were interwoven to construct these young women's representations to make them intelligible as girls and young women. Within the coverage, the trope of culture clash anchored in an Orientalist framing worked to consolidate their representations as worthy victims and re-inscribe the national imaginary of Canadian society as egalitarian, tolerant and beyond gender violence. These different maneuvers served to accomplish a kind of posthumous rescue in a domestic context akin to the strategies of rescue implemented by Western powers in the War on Terror to save Afghan women.

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Walking Memory

Berlin's “Holocaust Trail“

Maria Pia Di Bella

Since the early 1990s, Berlin has developed what I call a “Holocaust trail“-circa twenty-five officially dedicated memorial sites recalling significant historical events leading to the Final Solution-without acknowledging it yet as a “trail.“ Berlin is already well known for its two famous museums-memorials: the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe (2005) and the Jewish Museum (2001), two strong statements meant to show how the town deals with the heritage of the Holocaust, how it tries to underline the absolute impossibility of its erasure from social memory and to fight revisionism. The different memorial sites of the Holocaust trail came into existence thanks to multiple initiatives that allowed the town to become a true laboratory for the politics of memory concerning the crimes of the Nazi state and the sufferings of the Jewish citizens that fell victim to the state's genocide.