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Shakespeare in Sarajevo

Theatrical and Cinematic Encounters with the Balkans War

Sara Soncini

Looking at contemporary conflict through the lens of the past has been a prominent aspect of Shakespeare’s afterlife. Even today, his plays continue to be mobilized in the Balkan region in order to address the aftermath of ethnic violence. This article focuses on theatrical and cinematic takes that are chronologically close but geographically distant from the Yugoslav context. Katie Mitchell’s staging of 3 Henry VI (1994), Sarah Kane’s play Blasted (1995) and Mario Martone’s documentary-style film, Rehearsal for War (1998) were all prompted by a deep-felt urge to confront the Bosnian war and reclaim it from the non-European otherness to which it systematically became confined in public discourse at the time. In Shakespeare, these artists found a powerful conceptual aid to universalize the conflict, as well as a means to address their discursive positioning as outsiders and its problematic implications.

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Sexy Shapes

Girls Negotiating Gender through Popular Music

Ann Werner

This article is based on ethnographic fieldwork done with a group of 14 to 16 year-old girls in a medium sized Swedish town. The study aimed to investigate the relationship between everyday music use and gender, ethnicity and sexuality. The question posed here is: "What negotiations take place when the girls discuss their favorite music and artists?" Research in response to this question shows that the identity work of negotiating how to be a teenage girl often relates to popular culture. The sample focuses on girls from Swedish, Bosnian, Turkish and Syrian backgrounds. In this article I report on the local ideas about gender and ethnicity claimed by the girls to influence their discussion of music, dress and behavior, as well as the desires that I argue structure such discussion. This research supports contemporary findings that mainstream popular music has cultural and social significance in young girls' lives.

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Labours of Inter-religious Tolerance

Cultural and Spatial Intimacy in Croatia and Turkey

Jeremy F. Walton

Based on ethnographic research in Croatia and Turkey, this article explores two projects of inter-religious tolerance in relation to broader logics of cultural and spatial intimacy. In the Croatian case, the focus is on the public discourse surrounding Rijeka's Nova Džamija [New Mosque] which pivoted on a perception of the shared victimization of Catholic Croats and Muslim Bosnians at the hands of Serbs during the wars of the 1990s. For Turkey, we focus on a project in Ankara that aims to provide a single site of worship for Sunni and Alevi Muslims, a 'mosque-cem house'. The analysis highlights some common formations of tolerance and cultural intimacy expressed by both projects, as well as the divergent spatial practices and modes of spatial intimacy that distinguish the two sites.

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Assemblies and the struggle to diffuse power

Ethnographic examples and contemporary practices

Stefano Boni

The article is focused on the practical mechanisms of assembly management in egalitarian settings in a comparative perspective: on the one hand, I examine assemblies in what may be termed classic ethnographic settings (principally East African pastoralists); on the other hand, I turn to meetings in recent social movements (the Occupy movement in the United States and Slovenia; the 15M in Spain; Greece and Bosnia). I have two principal aims. First, I wish to identify and evaluate similarities and differences in the running of meetings with regard to processes of consensus building; the coordination of assemblies through the creation of roles and the menace of leadership; and the management of place, time, and speech. Second, I aim to evaluate current social movements' use of alterpolitics, intended as the practical and imaginary reference to group meetings of the historical, sectarian, or ethnic other.

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Tobias Kelly, Avi Brisman, Lisa Anderson-Levy, Olivera Simic and Livia Holden

Coles, Kimberley. 2007. Democratic Designs: International intervention and electoral practices in post-war Bosnia-Herzegovina. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. ISBN: 978-0-472-06985-9. 320 pgs. 31 figures, 6 tables. $26.95.

Goodale, Mark and Sally Engle Merry (2007) The Practice of Human Rights: Tracking Law Between the Global and the Local. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN: 978-0-521-68378-4, xii + 384 pp, $39.99

Lazarus-Black, Mindie. 2007. Everyday Harm: Domestic Violence, Court Rites, and Cultures of Reconciliation. Champaign, IL: University of Illinois Press. ISBN: 978-0-252-07408-0. 264 pp. $22.00.

Pouligny, Beatrice. 2006. Peace Operations Seen from Below: UN Missions and Local People. USA: Kumarian Press. ISBN: 978 156549 224 0 276 295 pp. $27.50.

Good, Anthony. 2007. Anthropology and Expertise in the Asylum Courts. New York: Cavendish. ISBN 978-1-904385-55-4 xxv + 299 pp.

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Chance, Fate, Luck

How the History of the World Turned on the Randomness of a Sunny Morning One Hundred Years Ago

Howard Cooper

A series of random, chance and synchronous events between 10:00 A.M. and 11:00 A.M. on 28 June 1914 catalysed the world into a war, the reverberations of which are still with us. The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his young wife by a Bosnian Serb unfolded through a sequence of unpredictable events, the absence of any one of which would have led history off into another direction. Although history is often thought about as if what actually happened had to happen – what Henri Bergson termed 'the illusions of retrospective determinism' – the events of that sunny June day belie that view. When in the Torah (Numbers 20) Moses strikes the rock, rather than speaking to it, there is a mystery involved as to why he acted as he did. But that moment sealed his fate. Acts which might seem insignificant at the time can have consequences, for us, our society, our world, that can never be imagined at the time – for good and for bad.

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Despite decades of official denial, modern Germany has always been a

country of immigration. From Poles migrating to the Ruhr in the late nineteenth

century, to German refugees and expellees after World War II, to

Italians and Greeks in the 1950s, to ethnic Germans from the former

Soviet Union and refugees from Bosnia in the 1990s, the country has a

long history of attracting newcomers. In fact, according to the recently

released 2011 census data, approximately 19 percent of the Federal Republic’s

population of around 80 million has a “migration background.”1 Of

course, this national average masks substantial variation at the state or city

level—places like Hamburg, Berlin and Baden-Württemberg have shares of

residents with such a background of a quarter or more, whereas the eastern

Länder have proportions under 5 percent. This sizeable population is

also very different than a generation ago—increasingly rooted and diverse:

60 percent of this group has German citizenship and about half of this subgroup

was born in Germany. Regarding countries of origin or ancestry,

17.9 percent have origins in Turkey, 13.1 percent in Poland, and about 8.7

percent in both Russia and Kazakhstan.

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Aspiring to alterpolitics

Anthropology, radical theory, and social movements

Riccardo Ciavolella and Stefano Boni

This theme section inquires into the contribution of political anthropology to radical theories, social imagination, and practices underlying political “alternatives”, which we propose to call “alterpolitics”. The issue of an alternative to contemporary powers in globalization is a central topic in social movements and radical debates. This sense of possibility for political alternatives is associated with the desertion of the belief in “the end of history”: the current economic crisis and the decline of Western hegemony presumably announce a radical transformation of the neoliberal world, opening space to alternatives. Actually, the reconfiguration of twentieth-century capitalism is associated with a growing mistrust of political institutions, the crisis being “organic”, in the Gramscian sense (Gramsci 1975). Recent social movements and insurrections around the world—from the “colored revolutions” in Central Asia to the Spanish indignados, the US Occupy movement, the Arab Spring, uprisings in Bosnia—have raised the issue of alternatives as a reaction to the incapacity of capitalist political institutions—from electoral democracy to dictatorships—to deal with people’s problems and meet their aspirations for emancipation and a better future.

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Markéta Slavková, Enikő Farkas, Daria Voyloshnikova, Máiréad Nic Craith, Aurélie Godet and Suzana Jovicic

Books

Azra Hromadžić (2015), Citizens of an Empty Nation: Youth and State- Making in Postwar Bosnia-Herzegovina (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press), 248 pp., $59.95, ISBN 9780812247008.

Alexandra Schwell, Nina Szogs, Małgorzata Kowalska, Michał Buchowski (eds.) (2016), New Ethnographies of Football in Europe: People, Passions, Politics (London: Palgrave Macmillan), 241pp., €72.99, ISBN: 978-1-137-51696-1.

Thomas Sikor, Stefan Dorondel, Johannes Stahl, and Phuc Xuan To (2017), When Things Become Property: Land Reform, Authority and Value in Postsocialist Europe and Asia: Max Planck Studies in Anthropology and Economy (Oxford: Berghahn), 250 pp., $120.00/£85.00, ISBN 978-1- 78533-451-1.

Helena Wulff (2017), Rhythms of Writing: An Anthropology of Irish Literature (London: Bloomsbury), 156 pp., £76.50, ISBN 978-1-4742-4413-8.

Films

Anja Unger, director (2016), Carnaval à Villingen: la cinquième saison, produced by ARTE, Le Film à la patte and L’Envol, 52 minutes.

Barbed Wire Fence and Viennese Coffee Houses: A Review of the 2017 Edition of Ethnocineca International Documentary Film Festival Vienna

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Aurélie Godet, Andre Thiemann, Fabiana Dimpflmeier, Anne-Erita Berta, Giuseppe Tateo, Alexandra Schwell, Greca N. Meloni and Lieke Wijnia

Jean-François Bert and Elisabetta Basso (eds) (2015), Foucault à Münsterlingen. À l’origine de l’Histoire de la folie (Paris: Éditions de l’EHESS), 285 pp., €24, ISBN 9782713225086.

Čarna Brković (2017), Managing Ambiguity: How Clientelism, Citizenship, and Power Shape Personhood in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Oxford: Berghahn), 208 pp., $120.00/£85.00, ISBN 9781785334146.

William A. Douglass (2015), Basque Explorers in the Pacific Ocean (Reno: University of Nevada Press), 230 pp., $24.95, ISBN 9781935709602.

Peter Naccarato, Zachary Nowak and Elgin K. Eckert (eds) (2017), Representing Italy through Food (London: Bloomsbury Academic), 269 pp., £85, ISBN 9781474280419.

Bruce O’Neill (2017), The Space of Boredom: Homelessness in the Slowing Global Order (Durham: Duke University Press), 280 pp., $25.95, ISBN 9780822363286.

Tomasz Rakowski (2016), Hunters, Gatherers, and Practitioners of Powerlessness: An Ethnography of the Degraded in Postsocialist Poland (Oxford: Berghahn), 332 pp., $130.00/£92.00, ISBN 9781785332401.

Antonio Sorge (2015), Legacies of Violence: History, Society, and the State in Sardinia (Toronto: University of Toronto Press), 232 pp., $24.61, ISBN 9781442627291.

Helena Wulff (ed.) (2016), The Anthropologist as Writer: Genres and Contexts in the Twenty-First Century (Oxford: Berghahn), 288 pp., $130.00/£92.00, ISBN 9781785330186.