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Walking to Write

Following Patrick Leigh Fermor across Europe

David Wills

Hook of Holland to the Golden Horn (London: Nicholas Brealey, 2014), 330 pp. ISBN: 978-1-85788-617-7, $17.95 (paperback). There have been many literary tributes to the celebrated British traveler, writer, and war hero of Nazi-occupied Greece, Sir

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Thomas K. Hubbard

Classical Athens offers a useful comparative test‐case for essentialist assumptions about the necessary harm that emanates from sexual intimacy between adults and adolescent boys. The Athenian model does not fit victimological expectations, but instead suggests that adolescent boys could be credited with considerable powers of discretion and responsibility in sexual matters without harming their future cultural productivity. Contemporary American legislation premised on children’s incapacity to “consent” to sexual relations stems from outmoded gender constructions and ideological preoccupations of the late Victorian and Progressive Era; that it has been extended to “protection” of boys is a matter of historical accident, rather than sound social policy. Rigorous social science and historical comparanda suggest that we should consider a different “age of consent” for boys and girls.

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(Re)sounding Histories

On the Temporalities of the Media Event

Penelope Papailias

At 10:30 am on 28 May 1999, an Albanian migrant worker, 24-year-old Flamur Pisli, known in Greece as “Antonis,” boarded a bus in a town at the outskirts of Thessaloniki where he had been living and working for several years. With a Kalashnikov rifle

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Translating the Concept of Experiment in the Late Eighteenth Century

From the English Philosophical Context to the Greek-Speaking Regions of the Ottoman Empire

Eirini Goudarouli and Dimitris Petakos

will investígate the transfer of the concept of experiment from the seventeenth-century British philosophical context to the eighteenth-century Greek-speaking intellectual context. 2 To be exact, we will study the dissemination of the concept of

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Robert Pirro

In times of political or social crisis, issues of identity and affiliation

tend to become more salient. In response to the threatened or actual

disruption of the routines of material provision, social order, and

ideological legitimation, definitions of self and community that had

formerly been considered authoritative come under more frequent

and more extensive questioning. Responses to this condition of

uncertainty and doubt about identity and affiliation are typically

forthcoming from many different quarters: party politicians, leaders

of social movements, public intellectuals, religious authorities. Such

responses can also be quite varied as was the case, for example, in

the aftermath of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Only months after the

event and with major questions about the future of the two Germanies

in the air, Jürgen Habermas surveyed the various possible sources of German identity that were on offer at that time—economic prestige

(“DM nationalism”), cultural inheritance, linguistic unity, ethnic

descent, historical fate, aesthetic experience, and constitutional patriotism—

and found all but the last seriously wanting.3 In any given

episode of crisis and questioning, most responses will ultimately

have little or no effect; the eventual reestablishment of the routines

of provision, order, and legitimation usually means that one or

another set of definitions of self and community has won out and

become authoritative for a critical mass of citizens.

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Fossilized Futures

Topologies and Topographies of Crisis Experience in Central Greece

Daniel M. Knight

One hundred forty to 200 million years ago, the Plain of Thessaly in central Greece was an ancient sea stretching from the Kalampaka pass, where today stands the geological wonder of Meteora, to the Aegean Sea beyond Larisa. If one knows where to

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Ivi Daskalaki and Nadina Leivaditi

The “humanitarian crisis” on the shores of Greece reached its peak in 2015, mobilizing multiple agents—national and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs), international bodies, local authorities, and volunteers—towards the development

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Migration and Citizenship in “Athens of Crisis”

An Interview with Vice Mayor Lefteris Papagiannakis

Aris Komporozos-Athanasiou and Nina Papachristou

The following is an interview conducted in August 2017 in Athens, Greece, between Eleftherios (Lefteris) Papagiannakis, Vice Mayor of Athens for Migrants, Refugees and Municipal Decentralization, and Aris Komporozos-Athanasiou. The interview

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“Eyes Shut, Muted Voices”

Narrating and Temporalizing the Post–Civil War Era through a Monument

Dimitra Gefou-Madianou

political and economic exploitation. These were related mainly to the use of the Arvanitic language, which questioned the locals’ Greekness, and the consumption of retsina wine, which turned them in the eyes of the ‘Athenian elite’ into ‘drunkards’ and

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The Naming of a Way of Life

Romaic V. Greek

Manos Georginis

In this essay I intend to define and clarify the terms Romios/Romaic/ Romiossini, Greek/Greekness/Greece, and Hellenic/Hellas, which very often confuse readers of Greek literature in translation. I will consider the use of these words in the poetry of Yannis Ritsos and in some anthologies of Greek poetry in translation. In my examination of the different usages of these terms, I will inevitably turn to history and draw distinctions between the Greek Orthodox East and the Christian West, sometimes expressing strong opinions.