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Neriko Musha Doerr

Though the concept ‘global learner’ has become a buzzword in education, few have critically analysed it. This article examines three types of ‘unlikely global learners’ who are not usually considered global learners even though they could be, according to a current definition: Ma¯ori–English bilingual students in Aotearoa/New Zealand; an American student who studied abroad in the U.K. in ways not valued in the dominant study-abroad discourse of immersion; and immigrant English-as-a-Second-Language students in the U.S. I analyse what their erasure as global learners tells us, arguing that the notion of global learner acts as what Walter Benjamin calls a phantasmagoria that masks the power relations involved. Though critical of ‘global learners’ as a globalist concept, I call for expanding the notion in order to engage with current transformations in education.

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Kerry D. Feldman and Lisa Henry

When engaged in doctoral research (1972) on urban squatter settlements in the Philippines, Feldman’s approach was guided by the pedagogy of Paulo Freire (2005[orig.1970]), which gratefully steered his behaviour away from the typical ‘Ugly American’ abroad in the world at the time (during the Vietnam War). Feldman became aware of the notions of ‘teacher-student’ and of ‘student-teacher’ primarily through his discussions with two Filipino doctors, Jess and Trini de la Paz (a husband and wife team), who organised a health education and training programme for volunteer participants from 12 squatter settlements in Davao City on the southern island of Mindanao. They invited him to serve as a social science consultant for their project. They explained that their approach to health education and training was grounded in, and would always adhere to, Freire’s insistence that oppressed people should be viewed as teachers for anyone engaging in their instruction or assistance, requiring that their teachers also become their students in understanding or assisting their lives.

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Lifelong Learning in Tokyo

A Satisfying Engagement with Action Research in Japan

Akihiro Ogawa

This article presents an action research project, which I have been managing since 2001 in Tokyo, Japan. It is based on a non-profit organization (NPO), a group that promotes community-oriented lifelong learning, which was established under the 1998 NPO Law. Action research is a social research strategy, carried out by a team that includes a professional researcher and members of a community who are jointly seeking to improve their situation. This paper shows primarily how I have engaged with people at my field site, an NPO called SLG (pseudonym), and how we have produced knowledge to make changes to improve the quality of social life for more than ten years. I provide a narrative concerning recent developments at SLG in order to demonstrate how an action research project like this continually unfolds.

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Alexander König and Daniel Bernsen

Mobile devices enable pupils to decode edificial remains and symbols by spontaneously accessing additional information electronically. This article provides guidelines for mobile learning in history on the basis of mobility and enquiry- and design-based learning. The authors explore ways in which pupils may use their mobile devices to create innovative forms of collaboratively generated products like digital stories or geocaches. By drawing on social networks in order to promote discussion and publications, such products entail social participation and commitment. Mobile history learning also helps pupils to understand public debates about history, memory, and identity.

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Novices in bureaucratic regimes

Learning to be a claimant in the United Kingdom

Michelle Obeid

This article tracks the learning experiences of a refugee mother in negotiating her housing rights during her first months of settlement in the United Kingdom. New migrants often experience bureaucracy as “novices” in unfamiliar legal and bureaucratic regimes. By contrast to common depictions of bureaucracies as predominant sites of disenchantment and frustration, I attend ethnographically to the ways in which novice claimants come to trust and value bureaucratic encounters as productive spaces that reveal to them the vocabulary of legitimacy as they learn to inhabit official categories and forge bureaucratic personhoods. I suggest an understanding of migrants’ previous knowledge of non-Western bureaucratic regimes shapes their experiences of ambiguity in bureaucracy.

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Michael Shire

In the post-war period, numerous Jewish schools and other educational institutions emerged throughout Europe. Some of these were recreated from old institutions of learning while others were brand new, catering for a new population in the post-war era. Each country and city grappled with the provision of Jewish education of its young in its own way. The national governments in Europe have different attitudes to funding and controlling religious education, and this has shaped formal Jewish education. Countries like England have incorporated Jewish day schools into their national schooling system, which require certain conditions on governance and curriculum provision to be met, but thereby provide free, accessible Jewish schools to all. Other countries like France and Germany offer a different model where Jewish religious education is handled outside the core curriculum of state schooling. Other factors that influence the differing models are the availability and training of teachers and madrichim as well as the funding possibilities for new schools, kindergartens and youth programming. Often new educational initiatives were sponsored by a single individual or were nurtured by Israeli or international Jewish organisations such as ORT or the Joint. In this last decade we are beginning now to see more systemised attempts to provide Jewish education, including more centralised training and cooperation.

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Stephen M. Lyon, Yasar Abu Ghosh, Pavel Himl, Tereza Stöckelová, Lucie Storchová, Robert Gibb, Jakob Krause-Jensen and Veerendra P. Lele

The choice of interdisciplinarities

Stephen M. Lyon

Multidisciplinarity as a necessity and challenge: the Department of General Anthropology, Faculty of Humanities, Charles University in Prague (FHS UK)

Yasar Abu Ghosh, Pavel Himl, Tereza Stöckelová and Lucie Storchová

Response to Sluis and Edwards, 'Rethinking combined departments'

Robert Gibb

Response to Sluis and Edwards, 'Rethinking combined departments'

Jakob Krause-Jensen

Response to Sluis and Edwards, 'Rethinking combined departments'

Veerendra P. Lele

Response from the authors, Ageeth Sluis and Elise Edwards

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Eluned Jones

Gaunt, Kyra D. 2006. The Games Black Girls Play: Learning the Ropes From Double-Dutch to Hip hop. New York: NY University Press.

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Penny Welch and Susan Wright

This tenth anniversary issue of Learning and Teaching: The International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences (LATISS) focuses on a range of learning and teaching innovations in our core disciplines of anthropology, politics and sociology.

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Penny Welch and Susan Wright

Welcome to this issue of Learning and Teaching: The International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences.