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Aparna Kumar, Mary Bouquet, Alexandra Woodall, Paulette Wallace, Arjmand Aziz, Elizabeth Edwards and Petra Mosmann

EXHIBITION REVIEW ESSAYS

Unsettling the National in South Asia: My East is Your West, Venice Biennale, and After Midnight, Queens Museum, New York

Nonstop Modernity: Renovating the Rijksmuseum

A Storehouse of Unimagined Treasures: York Art Gallery and the Centre of Ceramic Art, York St Mary’s

EXHIBITION REVIEWS

The Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart

Indigenous Australia: Enduring Civilisation, British Museum, London

Photography: A Victorian Sensation, National Museums of Scotland, Edinburgh, and Framed: People and Place in Irish Photography, Ulster Museum, Belfast

Girls at the Tin Sheds: Sydney Feminist Posters 1975–1990, University Art Museum, Sydney, and Girls at the Tin Sheds (Duplicated), Verge Gallery, Sydney

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Julie Gough, Jonathan Jones, Kelli Cole, Shari Lett, Glenn Iseger-Pilkington, Billie Lythberg, Jennifer Walklate, Jeanine Nault, Jake Homiak, Joshua A. Bell and Natasha Barrett

MEETING REPORTS

Reflections from a Panel of Indigenous Speakers at the New Encounters Conference (National Museum of Australia, Canberra, 16–18 March 2016)

The Twelfth Pacific Arts Association (International Symposium, Auckland, New Zealand, 14–17 March 2016)

The Museum in the Global Contemporary: Debating the Museum of Now (University of Leicester School of Museum Studies 50th Anniversary Conference, 18–22 April 2016)

PROJECT REPORTS

Digitizing Endangered Language Materials at the National Anthropological Archives at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History

Honoring and Interpreting the Past: Project Review of the Collaboration between Māori artist George Nuku and National Museums of Scotland, Edinburgh

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Collective Biography

An Introduction

Marnina Gonick and Susanne Gannon

In June 2011, seven feminist academics gathered to spend a week working together on a collective biography workshop in a small resort town, called Hawk’s Nest, in New South Wales, Australia. Some of us were senior faculty with prior experience with the methodology of collective biography, others were freshly minted or about to be minted PhDs who were totally new to the research methodology. Some of us knew each other from other contexts, and others were meeting for the first time. We were from five different university institutions, working in a range of fields in schools of Education.

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Erica Morales, Alex Blower, Samantha White, Angelica Puzio and Matthew Zbaracki

Ingram, Nicola. 2018. Working-Class Boys and Educational Success: Teenage Identities, Masculinities, and Urban Schooling. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Pinkett, Matt, and Mark Roberts. 2019. Boys Don’t Try? Rethinking Masculinity in Schools. London: Routledge.

Agyepong, Tera Eva. 2018. The Criminalization of Black Children: Race, Gender, and Delinquency in Chicago’s Juvenile Justice System, 1899–1945. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Farrell, Warren, and John Gray. 2018. The Boy Crisis. Dallas, TX: BenBella Books.

Potter, Troy. 2018. Books for Boys: Manipulating Genre in Contemporary Australian Young Adult Fiction.Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier.

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Facing East, Facing West

Mark Twain's Following the Equator and Pandita Ramabai's The Peoples of the United States

Brian Yothers

Mark Twain's Following the Equator (1897), a narrative of a journey to the South Pacific, Australia, South Asia, and South Africa, has occupied a small but significant space in the consideration of Twain's wider career as both a travel writer and social critic. Twain's work has not, however, been considered in conjunction with the works of later nineteenth-century South Asian travelers in North America. The present article puts Twain's discussion of India and Ceylon (present-day Sri Lanka) in dialogue with Indian scholar and women's rights activist Pandita Ramabai's 1889 travelogue The Peoples of the United States.

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Diana Glazebrook

Restrictive conditions of temporary protection have required refugees to be resourceful and tactful in managing their own ‘resettlement’ in Australia. Ethnographic research among Hazara refugees from Central Afghanistan living on temporary protection visas, reveals the mobile phone to be fundamental to restoring their lives after detention. Hazara have made use of their mobile phones to establish a point of contact, get their bearings, and reposition themselves at the locus of their own new social networks. This article explores the affect of mobile phone use in a situation of temporary protection, in terms of a rubric of resilience.

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"Everyone Has Done Very Well"

Going Through the Motions at the News Corporation AGM

Roland Kapferer

I present here an account of the incorporation of a media company hitherto part of a peripheral state within the juridical economic order of a global power—the United States of America. I concentrate on the crucial performative event in which Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation is trans-corporated from an Australian registered business to an American one. The event I describe is in fact a rite de passage whereby a local company is legally recognized as a global power. The approach I take is in effect a situational analysis in the tradition of Max Gluckman, wherein the description is part of the analysis.

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Rescuing Indigenous Land Ownership

Revising Locke's Account of Original Appropriation through Cultivation

S. Stewart Braun

As part of his account of original appropriation, John Locke famously argued that uncultivated land was open to acquisition. Historically, this account has played a large role in justifying the seizure of indigenous land. In this article, I contend that despite the past acts of dispossession Locke's account seemingly justified, a complete rejection of Locke's idea of original appropriation would be a mistake since a generalised account can be constructed that does not subvert indigenous ownership. I also contend that the revised account can be used to critique the current legal and political situation regarding native title in Australia.

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Catherine Byron, Adrian Caesar, Philip Callow, Barry Cole, George Dandoulakis, Angela Leighton, Clare MacDonald Shaw, John Mole, Tom Paulin, Peter Porter, Philip Ramp, Arnold Rattenbury, Maurice Rutherford, William Scammell, Matt Simpson, Mahendra Solanki, Anne Stevenson, Tim Thorne, John Tranter, Dimitris Tsaloumas, Gael Turnbull and Hugh Underhill

St Thomas Aquinas in MacNeice’s House, September 23rd, 1957

In an Australian Garden

Red Wine and Yellow Sun

For a Cornet Player, Retired

The Altar of the Motherland (trans.: Andreas Kalvos)

Looking at Pictures

Street Flowers

Fats

Oxford

The Puppy of Heaven

The Island Market

More Friggers for John: 22: Convict Tokens 1815-1840; 23: Trench Art 1914-1918

Only Connect

Self Improvement

Taking the Hexameter a Walk – a letter to John Lucas

From ‘The Riverside’

A Ballad for Apothecaries, Being a Poem to Honour the Memory of Nicholas Culpeper, Gent …

The Aisles

Sails

Aegina

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Mémoire Involontaire

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"I Feel Older"

Investigating the Impact of a Father and Son

William John Jennings

This article reports on the impact of a school based father and son, “rites of passage” program on its participants in two Australian Catholic boys’ schools. The author conducted a mixed methodology study investigating quantitative differences between 15- to 17-year-old adolescent participants and non-participants in how they rated their “father relationships” and the impact that specific program elements (the “rite of passage,” planned conversations, and public acknowledgements) had on both program participants. The research found evidence to support the program’s positive impact on father-son relationships. As a result of planned conversations with their fathers in the program, participants reported feeling “older” and more mature.