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‘Isteach chun an Oileáin’

Reflections on Community Mapping

Liam Campbell and Iain Mackinnon

Since 2007 the Irish government have prevented the fisher-men of the Donegal islands of Arranmore, Tory and Inishbofin from engaging in their generations-old drift-net salmon fishery. We have been involved in supporting the islanders as they organise themselves to find ways to oppose the ban. In this dialogue we reflect on some aspects of our involvement.

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Pioneering Doktormutter

Remembering Ina-Maria Greverus

Helena Wulff

The author reconsiders German scholar Ina-Maria Greverus as a committed feminist supporter of female doctoral students and early career academics. Greverus acted as an innovator especially in the realms of anthropology and aesthetics, and initiated a new international dialogue forum with the Anthropological Journal or European Cultures, which she founded in 1990 together with Christian Giordano.

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Dorothee Schaper

First, I want to say thank you for the invitation to speak here to you on the ‘holy mountain’ from a Protestant perspective. With me, you get a reverend from the Protestant church in Rhineland. I live with my bicultural family in Cologne and I work for the section on theology, ecumenics and interreligious dialogue at the Melanchthon Academy, the place for Protestant adult education in Cologne. For a long time it has been a place for Christian-Jewish and Christian-Muslim dialogue, and sometimes we succeed to talk as all three together. For example at the evangelischen Kirchentag in Cologne we organised an Abraham center and we signed the Cologne Peace Declaration, signed by representatives from synagogues, mosques and the churches.

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Matthias Börner

Starting with the idea that individual concerns and agendas are based on personal life experiences the author expresses his view of social responsibility by describing some formative personal life experiences and encounters and formulating his findings. So the hermeneutic of life defines the effect on one's social responsibility. However this does not mean that aspects of social responsibility are an individual and arbitrarily matter, but instead are mainly based on encounter and dialogue: listening to and being aware of to the needs of people, and fortering and supporting a society which allows for and appreciates diversity and the exchange of views. Accordingly , a basic social responsibility is to advocate human rights and to support democratic structures - particularly for religious communities which have the power to shape society. Finally there is no special Christian or religious moral or value. But believers carry a hope and a power, not from this world, to seek dialogue and let society experience the love of God.

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Jonathan Magonet

It is with great sadness that we record the death after a long illness, on 3 May 2009, of Mme Colette Kessler, one of the leading figures of liberal Judaism in France. She was above all a teacher and educator, responsible for developing the educational programmes at the Union Libéral Israélite (ULI) and subsequently the Mouvement Juif Libéral de France (MJLF) in Paris. But she was also dedicated to developing Jewish-Christian dialogue, participating in innumerable conferences, encounters, studies and religious services. She addressed the World Union for Progressive Judaism Conference in Paris in 1995 on ‘The Urgency of a Jewish Response in the Inter-religious Dialogue’ anticipating by five years the appearance in the United States of ‘Dabru Emet, A Jewish Statement about Christianity’.

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Between Practice and Theory

Dialogical Teaching and Art as Performative

Nathaniel Prottas

In this article, I consider the definition and use of the term dialogue in museum education, focusing on the work of Rika Burnham and Elliot Kai-Kee, whose ramifications for art itself have often been sidelined by educators. First, I examine the relationship between Burnham and Kai-Kee’s theory of education and Hans-Georg Gadamer’s and John Dewey’s writing on art, arguing that dialogical museum teaching implicitly relies on a definition of art as performative. Then, I explore the ramifications of Gadamer’s and Dewey’s definition of art as performative for the field of museum education. Finally, I argue that by understanding art as an active participant in our encounters with it—and by refocusing our attention on art’s role in museum educational practice—we create a radically new argument for museums as educational institutions that bring people and art into dialogue with each other.

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Ârash Aminian Tabrizi, Kate Kirkpatrick and Marieke Mueller

This special issue of Sartre Studies International represents a selection of the papers presented at a conference held on the 30th and 31st of January 2015 at the Maison Française d’Oxford. Called ‘Thinking with Sartre Today/Penser avec Sartre aujourd’hui’, the bilingual conference with participants from across the world provided a forum for scholars studying Sartre in diverse intellectual milieux to dialogue fruitfully and forge new connections.

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Carol Banks

The six articles collected in this third issue in Volume 13 encompass a variety of sources and approaches. The texts examined date from the sixteenth century through to the twentieth. They range from novels to plays, musical scores to diplomatic letters and legal documents, and draw on selected historical, theoretical, philosophical and psychological tracts, advocating the journal’s interest in the dialogue between literary and cultural studies.

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Ned Lazarus

Sami Adwan and Dan Bar-On, eds., Learning the Other’s Historical Narrative: Israelis and Palestinians, Parts One and Two (Beit Jalla: Peace Research Institute in the Middle East, 2003, 2006).

Robert I. Rotberg, ed., Israeli and Palestinian Narratives of Conflict: History’s Double Helix (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2006).

Paul Scham, Walid Salem, and Benjamin Pogrund, eds., Shared Histories: A Palestinian-Israeli Dialogue (Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press, 2005).

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Michael Shire

The tasks that Rabbi Baeck sets out for us are the text and context for our conference. His own contributions to the science and study of Judaism, his focus on aggadic literature, a dialogue with Christianity and a vigorous defence of Judaism's covenant with the living God will inform and guide our deliberations throughout the four days. Each day will deal with a thematic aspect of the challenges and tasks facing Progressive Judaism while the conference as a whole seeks to engage us all in a debate about our future in the light of our own spiritual and intellectual inheritance.