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Tova Gamliel

The wailing of Yemenite Jewish women, as preserved in the Yemenite Jewish community in Israel, is presented as a case study for analysis of and comparison with other existing wailing cultures. The article uses a model of identities to examine anthropological conventions that interpret death rituals as rites of transition and crisis. A well-known function of wailing—as a bridge between life and death—is decoded in view of the model. The gender dimension of wailing is examined by counterposing and juxtaposing feminine wailing to masculine wailing at death events. The article describes the relative contributions of men and women to the stability of their community and analyzes the unique characteristics of the psycho-social power of women's wailing.

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Kirk Simpson

Shadows of War: Violence, Power and International Profiteering in the Twenty-First Century. By Carolyn Nordstrom. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004, 306pp, $55. ISBN: 0520242416.

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Thomas D. Hall

Islam, Md. Saidul. 2013. Development, Power, and the Environment: Neoliberal Paradox in the Age of Vulnerability . New York: Routledge. Islam, Md. Saidul. 2014. Confronting the Blue Revolution: Industrial Aquaculture and Sustainability in the

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Beverly Crawford Ames and Armon Rezai

his nascent skills at sorcery by bringing useful household tools to life and making them “self-regulating.” He gives them the power to accomplish their tasks on their own without the apprentice having to use them. At first, the plan works well, but

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Art to Table

The Power of Aesthetics in Women’s Cookbooks of the Belle Époque

Samantha Presnal

professional cookbooks to apply it to the domestic realm, thereby undergirding their own culinary authority. As a tradition directly descended from French aristocratic practices, haute cuisine had long connoted power. By undercutting the sovereignty of the male

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Gudrun Willett

In a three-year ethnographic study of a selective U.S. liberal arts college, it was found that educational development efforts contributed not only to changes in teaching but also to cross-college collaboration and the development of a sense of community. In the 1990s and early 2000s, the college created a learning centre and new educational development activities that spoke to faculty members' needs and college interests. Following these changes, increased collegiality could be seen in collaborations among college employees, and in the educational development activities themselves, resulting in increased interest in educational development. These institutional changes were only made possible because of the college's relatively democratic governance structure, relatively high levels of faculty members' power on campus, and an environment in which ideas and practices could be challenged and re-conceptualised (at least by some employees). Ultimately, this paper argues for more attention to the interrelationships between campus collegiality, teaching and learning, and power in institutions of higher education.

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Penny McCall Howard

This article examines the "power and the pain of class relations" (Ortner 2006) through the experience of Scottish men working in the global shipping, offshore oil, and fishing industries: industries in which the nationality of workers has changed significantly since the 1980s. It combines recent anthropological literature on subjectivity and cosmopolitanism with a Marxist understanding of class as generated through differing relationships to production. The article describes how British seafarers have experienced the cosmopolitanization of their workplaces, as workers from Portugal, Eastern Europe, and the Philippines have been recruited by employers in order to reduce wages, working conditions, and trade union organization. Drawing on Therborn (1980), it concludes that the experiences gained through this process have led to the development of multiple and often contradictory subjectivities, which people draw on as they choose how to act in moments of crisis, and as they imagine possible futures.

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Marjorie Harness Goodwin

Making use of videotaped interactions of lunchtime conversations among multi-ethnic preadolescent peers (based on three years of fieldwork in LA) this ethnographically based study investigates the embodied language practices through which girls construct friendship alliances as well as relationships of power and exclusion. Girls display “best friend” relations not only through roles they select in dramatic play, such as twins married to twins in “house,” but also through embraces and celebratory handclaps that affirm alliances. Older (sixth grade) girls assert their power with respect to younger fourth grade girls through intrusive activities such as grabbing food from lunchboxes, insults, and instigating gossip; younger girls boldly resist such actions through fully embodied stances. Relations of exclusion are visible not only in seating arrangements of a marginalized “tagalong” girl with respect to the friendship clique, but also highlighted in the ways she is differentially treated when an implicit social norm is violated.

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Traveling and Power

A Portuguese Viceroy's Account of a Voyage to India

João Vicente Melo

More than a mere travel diary the account written by Francisco Raimundo Moraes Pereira of the voyage of the Portuguese viceroy Francisco de Távora to India offers an interesting description of how the long journey between Lisbon and Goa was the first stage of a long process that transformed an aristocrat into an alter ego of the monarch. This article explores how Moraes Pereira combined a travel diary, with detailed notes on the daily life of the Carreira da India, and a panegyric concerned in fabricating an ideal image of a viceroy.

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Justice and Power

A Jewish Perspective

Uri Regev

I have tried to portray the rich tapestry that the Jewish tradition presents to us when we seek guidance as to the pursuit of justice and its role in overcoming the painful ongoing conflict between Israel and the Palestinians. My selection, undoubtedly, has been subjective, though I have tried to present different and conflicting perspectives. The clear conclusion that one may derive is that there is no one Jewish perspective of justice, nor one avenue for its application in present-day conflicts. Judaism expects us to make choices. Judaism, and religion altogether, can be a source of healing and strong proponent of peace. Alas, it can also serve to demonize the other, reduce his/her rights and justify subversion of the spirit of justice.