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"Everyone Has Done Very Well"

Going Through the Motions at the News Corporation AGM

Roland Kapferer

I present here an account of the incorporation of a media company hitherto part of a peripheral state within the juridical economic order of a global power—the United States of America. I concentrate on the crucial performative event in which Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation is trans-corporated from an Australian registered business to an American one. The event I describe is in fact a rite de passage whereby a local company is legally recognized as a global power. The approach I take is in effect a situational analysis in the tradition of Max Gluckman, wherein the description is part of the analysis.

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Rescuing Indigenous Land Ownership

Revising Locke's Account of Original Appropriation through Cultivation

S. Stewart Braun

As part of his account of original appropriation, John Locke famously argued that uncultivated land was open to acquisition. Historically, this account has played a large role in justifying the seizure of indigenous land. In this article, I contend that despite the past acts of dispossession Locke's account seemingly justified, a complete rejection of Locke's idea of original appropriation would be a mistake since a generalised account can be constructed that does not subvert indigenous ownership. I also contend that the revised account can be used to critique the current legal and political situation regarding native title in Australia.

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John Greening and John Lucas

Wild Track by Mark Haworth-Booth (London: Trace Editions, 2005), 60 pp, ISBN 0-95509-450-X, £10.00

What is the Purpose of Your Visit? by Wanda Barford (Hexham: Flambard Press, 2005), 80 pp, ISBN 1-87322-679-9, £7.50

Under the Hammer by Robert Roberts (London: Pikestaff Press, 2006), 126 pp, ISBN 1-90097-432-0, £7.50

Fighting Talk by Cathy Grindrod, (London: Headland, 2005), 60 pp, ISBN 1-90209-692-4, £7.50

The Rain and The Glass by Robert Nye (London: Greenwich Exchange, 2004), 122 pp, ISBN 1-87155-141-2, £9.95

Highwire by Adrian Caesar (Canberra,Australia: Pandanus Books, 2007), 93 pp, ISBN 1-74076-178-2, £10.00

Catallus by Mario Petrucci (London: Perdika Press, 2006), 24pp, ISBN 1-90564-900-2, £4.50

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Choosing A Heim

Survivors of the Holocaust and Post-war Immigration

Sharon Kangisser Cohen

Over the past decade, the question of where Holocaust survivors chose to rebuild their lives after the war has been the focus of much debate. This discussion is arguably a response to a post-Zionist discourse which claims that many survivors, when choosing where to immigrate after the war, were manipulated by the Zionist movement into making aliya. Through the examination of survivor testimony, this article will consider survivors' personal deliberations and considerations regarding their post-war immigration. It explores the factors that influenced their decision-making process, asking specifically whether survivors immigrated to the country that offered them the first chance of leaving Europe, by 'instinctive' or 'intuitive' Zionism, or if they were motivated by other concerns. This study is based on over eighty survivor testimonies, collected in Israel, Australia and the United States over the last twenty years.

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Simon Roberts, Annalise Weckesser-Muthalali, Rachel Douglas-Jones, Monica Janowski and Mari Korpela

Ethnography and the Corporate Encounter: Reflections on Research in and of Corporations. Melissa Cefkin (ed.), Oxford and New York: Berghahn, 2009, ISBN 978-1-84545-598-9 (Hardback) ISBN 978-1-84545-777-8 (Paperback) 262 pp. Hb £50.00 Pb £21.00

Engaging Contradictions: Theory, Politics and Methods of Activist Scholarship. Charles R. Hale (ed.), Berkeley: University of California Press, 2008, ISBN: 978-0-520-09861-9 (Paperback Only) 417 pp. £24.95

The Anthropology of Organizations. Alberto Corsín Jiménez (ed.), Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007, ISBN: 978-0-7546-2595-7 (hardback only) 600 pp. £165.00

State, Communities and Forests in Contemporary Borneo. Fadzilah Majid Cooke (ed.), Canberra: Australian National University Press, 2006, ISBN 1-9209425-1-3 (Print Version) 208 pp.

The Nomads of Mykonos: Performing Liminalities in a ‘Queer’ Space. Pola Bousiou, New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2008, 322 pages, Paperback £15.95, ISBN: 978-1-84545-426-5

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Janet McDonald

In elite boys’ schools there is a level of anxiety about the perceived place of the curricular subject drama and how it might interact or interfere with the ironclad essentialist and homogenous masculinity promoted by elite all-boys’ schools. The feminization of the drama and the suspicion of males who “do drama” create a duplicitous tension for boys who take the subject as they walk the gendered tightrope between the expected public display of the “muscular Christian” and the tantalizing “drama faggot.” This paper offers some reflections about observations on and interviews with boys who “do drama” inside the male-only worlds of the Great Public School (GPS) of Brisbane, Australia. In these schools I observed masculinities were constantly disrupted (perhaps uniquely) in the drama classroom and explored by male drama teachers who provided a space in which to playfully interrogate the “muscular Christian ideal” of a boys’ school.

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Books Are Boring! Books Are Fun!

Boys’ Polarized Perspectives on Reading

Laura Scholes

This article draws on interview data gathered from a broader study concerned with examining issues associated with boys, masculinities, and reading at school. The focus is on eight boys in Years 5 and 6 who attend schools in a range of socioeconomic communities in Australia. The boys offer polarized perspectives on reading, with four boys reporting positive attitudes toward reading and describing reading books as “fun” and another four boys describing reading books as “boring.” Examined are inflections in these two groups of boys’ experiences as readers at school, making visible the way boys’ attitudes influence engagement with reading. This research moves beyond broad generalizations about boys to consider complexities inherent in notions of masculinity and how different groups of boys internalize their positioning of reading in ways that influence their attitudes, engagement, and subsequently outcomes in reading.

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The Rite Journey

Rediscovering Rites of Passage for Boys

Andrew Lines and Graham Gallasch

The Rite Journey is a program to allow Australian Year-9 male students age 14-15 years to share a year-long partnership with a teacher-guide as the boy explores what it means to become a respectful and responsible man. Given the current view that rites of passage need to be rediscovered for young people in Western culture, a feature of the program is specially created ceremonies held throughout the year. These celebration points follow the seven steps of a hero’s journey. Curricular content is based on four topics: relationships with self, others, the divine and the world. This paper recounts the program’s background and form and includes feedback of boys who have participated in the program.

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Victor Igreja

In spite of the growing public focus on domestic violence (DV) in mainstream Australian society, ethnographers have remained aloof from analysing this problem. In an ethnographic study in the Brisbane region, I analysed people’s perceptions of anti-violence images that were part of a public campaign and assessed the appropriateness of the images’ locations. Occasionally, my interlocutors unexpectedly included accounts of DV. My analysis reveals the tensions between public display and the concealment underlying the campaign. The interlocutors revealed experiences of competing responsibilities related to DV. The use of subtle images of anti-violence in locations filled with competing images, coupled with a failure to consider historical continuities and changes in local imaginaries of violence, exposed the difficulties associated with conveying persuasive messages of DV prevention.

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A State of Force

The Repressive Policing of Contention in Queensland under Frederic Urquhart

Paul Bleakley

Australian history is littered with examples of situations in which police have engaged in the use of force—in some cases, disproportionate violence—to maintain order and stability. In addition to this effort to control the population and ensure social order, extreme use of force was a key factor in repressing civil dissent and preventing marginalized communities from exercising their voice within the social discourse. Former Queensland Police Commissioner Frederic Urquhart was at the forefront of several high-profile examples of police enforcing social control during his tenure with the Queensland police, including the punitive expeditions of the Native Mounted Police Force, the civil disorder of the 1912 general strike, and the chaos associated with the 1919 Red Flag riots. In developing an appreciation for Urquhart’s behavior and motivations, it can be seen that the Queensland police have always served as a body dedicated to ensuring conformity through any means necessary.