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Common Democracy

Political Representation beyond Representative Democracy

Alexandros Kioupkiolis

. Absolute Democracy beyond Representation? On the other side of the debate, Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri (2004: 240–241, 247, 255) uncover a certain promise of absolute democracy that is embedded from the outset in modern democracy—the “rule of everyone

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Lynn Hunt

Robert R. Palmer exemplified the best that historians have to offer. He wrote with conviction, empathy, and at times passion, yet he always managed to maintain balance and portray both the good and the bad in the people and events he brought to life for his readers. Because he wrote with conviction, he also wrote with exceptional clarity. He never displayed the impulse to hide behind highfalutin language, contorted prose, or excessively specialized topics. He believed that democracy was an absolute good, that it had its origins in European history, and that its rise provided one of, or even perhaps the principal theme of all of modern history. As a consequence, he never lost his sympathy for the French revolutionaries of 1789–1794, however terrible their actions, however much they fell short of living up to their ideals.

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Art to Table

The Power of Aesthetics in Women’s Cookbooks of the Belle Époque

Samantha Presnal

Abstract

Throughout much of the nineteenth century, men enjoyed hegemony in the French culinary arts, an entitlement enshrined in the books they wrote about cooking and gastronomy. The Belle Époque brought the first challenge to this absolute authority with the publication and popularization of cookbooks written for women, by women. Through the close reading of a selected corpus from the period, this article considers the implications of this shift in authorship. Women cookbook writers infused aesthetic discourse and principles into both the content and style of their texts. While male chefs had also drawn parallels between the culinary arts and the fine arts in order to augment their professional status, female authors evoked this relationship in as well as on di?erent terms. I argue that women cookbook writers engaged with aesthetic theory in a way that legitimized the labor of the private sphere and contested normative ideas about the inferiority of the feminine.

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Avery Poole

significant political diversity among ASEAN member states (see table 1 ); they comprise an absolute monarchy (Brunei Darussalam); socialist/communist one-party states (Laos and Vietnam); dominant-party parliamentary systems (Cambodia, Malaysia, Singapore and

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The Will of the People?

Carl Schmitt and Jean-Jacques Rousseau on a Key Question in Democratic Theory

Samuel Salzborn

large. However, it is not possible to calculate the most effective and sensible ratio in absolute terms, but only relative ones. The reason for this is that this phenomenon is qualitative and thus a social one, and cannot be resolved by simple

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Niki Megalommati

According to Roman law, the foundation of society was the patria potestas (the power of the father of the household or paterfamilias ), which constituted an absolute authority over wives and children. 47 Christian teachings attempted to restrict the power

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Jan Ifversen

history, they have to begin and end somewhere. Every narrative has a beginning and an ending. Historians will normally escape mythical ideas of absolute beginnings and relativize endings. For them there is no end to history. Particular narratives might be

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Daniel Lord Smail

chronic stress is associated with poverty and the condition of being disempowered. Crucially, what may matter is not absolute poverty but relative poverty. As Amartya Sen pointed out in 1999, African Americans as a whole are wealthier than the inhabitants

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Does Democratic Theory Need Epistemic Standards?

Grounds for a Purely Procedural Defense of Majority Rule

Carlo Invernizzi-Accetti

agree with in order to effect a change in the will of the state, the easier it is to achieve a concordance between the individual will and the will of the state. Here, then, an absolute majority does in fact constitute the upper limit. Anything less

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Jean Terrier

historically accurate to suggest that pluralists have rarely been proponents of absolute pluralization. The contribution of this article will be, first, to give some plausibility to these two observations, and second, to offer an explanation of the unavoidable