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Hebrew Literature in the ‘World Republic of Letters’

Translation and Reception, 1918–2018

Yael Halevi-Wise and Madeleine Gottesman

Having recently dusted itself off from a religious domain, Hebrew literature today must rely on translation and international dissemination to reach beyond its five million native speakers. Although Hebrew certainly falls into the category of lesser

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Hebrew Dystopias

From National Catastrophes to Ecological Disasters

Netta Bar Yosef-Paz

In the past decade, a new wave of Hebrew dystopic novels has appeared, ranging from complex and elevated literary pieces like Imagine a Mountain ( Bet Levi 2014 ) and 2023 (Sarna 2014) to the simplistic and naive The Sea Above Us ( Rubinstein

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Adriana X. Jacobs

many, in many languages) complicate and enrich this relation? This article opens with a consideration of the rich legacy of Hebrew translations of Shakespeare’s Sonnets , highlighting how Hebrew translation practices have aligned closely with

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The Word of the Lord to Shylock

Biblical Forms in the Translations of Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice to Hebrew

Atar Hadari

that runs alongside the text itself, a tradition of interpretation which I will argue has been imported into the Hebrew translations and guided translation choices in the text. I will focus on the translation of just two words in the most famous speech

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The Task of the Hebrew Translation

Reading into Othello’s Indian/Iudean Crux in the First Hebrew Translation

Eran Tzelgov

The 1870s mark the first translations of complete Shakespeare plays into Hebrew: Ithiel ha-Kushi mi-Vineẓya (Othello , 1874) and Ram ve-Yaʿel (Romeo and Juliet , 1878). These translations, by the Jewish convert to Christianity Isaac Edward

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Shiran Avni

According to Hanna Scolnicov, ‘Biblical Hebrew is not a neutral language, that easily encompasses new ideas. It holds within itself a whole universe of associations, beliefs, stories, and prayers, that become the language’s intertext. Every

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Gideon Kouts

Hebrew culture, including the press and theatre criticism, has always maintained a tangled and delicate relationship with Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice , for understandable reasons. This article investigates the first criticism of this

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A Hebrew Take on Shylock on the New York Stage

Shylock ‘47 at the Pargod Theatre (1947)

Edna Nahshon

Shylock’47 , a production of the Pargod Theatre 1 , opened on 27 May 1947 in New York City at the Juilliard School of Music, with subsequent performances at the Masters Institute. Staged entirely in Hebrew, it was a bold and pioneering

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Albert I. Baumgarten

introduces and presents the English original of the preface Dame Mary Douglas (1921–2007) wrote for the Hebrew translation of Purity and Danger , which appeared in 2010 as part of the Libido (Sociology/Anthropology) Translation Series, published by Resling

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Eran Shuali

. 3 Since shortly after his conversion and until his sudden death in 1883, 4 Salkinson published Hebrew translations of the following books: Paul’s Epistle to the Romans (1855); 5 Philosophy of the Plan of Salvation by an American Citizen (1858